Tag Archives: Kelly Pavlik

Jermain Taylor Arrested In Shooting Altercation

Very sad news to report as Jermain Taylor was arrested in connection with a shooting that left his cousin hospitalized in serious condition.

Details here:

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2014/aug/26/sheriffs-office-intruder-shot-jermain-taylors-home/

Jermaine Taylor had a life in the mold of a classic All American type as any boy born in Arkansas could ever hope for. He was personable and telegenic, yet humble and disciplined, a working man’s hero who abundantly gave back to the community who had supported him. He rose through the competitive ranks of boxing as a skinny amateur onto Olympic medal honors before winning the most unified world title in history against Bernard Hopkins. Subsequent P4P accolades and various media honors further feathered out his nest. Taylor was married to a beautiful collegiate basketball player who shared his Southern and athletic roots and had started a family as any proper All American should.

Life was beautiful, the fish were jumping, his purses substantial, and he was highly regarded in the boxing industry. Who could ever ask for more?

Then he got tangled up with Kelly Pavlik in an explosive life and death classic and neither has ever been the same since though Taylor’s plunge from the heady heights was more immediate. Yet here he was again, poised in the queue of greatness to challenge new IBF champion Sam Soliman just down the river at the Beau Rivage in Biloxi, Mississippi only 6 weeks from now, but it looks to have all come tumbling down on him with the news of his arrest.

He’ll be going through the justice system for however long that takes with whatever restrictions they impose until his case comes to a conclusion. He has yet to regain a boxing license, so hopefully this is an opportunity disguised as a warning shot across the bow that he may need help in restructuring his life.

All our best to the extended Taylor family members…

All American Taylors

All American Taylors

The Fight That Never Was–Saul Canelo Alvarez vs Paul The Punisher Williams

Paul The Punisher Williams used to be known as the fighter who took over the mantle of the most ducked fighter in boxing from Antonio Margarito. Listed as 6-1 with a 79 ” reach on Boxrec for promotional purposes so as not to scare off potential opponents, he was noticeably taller and rangier than stablemate heavyweight Chris Arreola who was listed as 6-3. Fight teams all knew his data was heavily fudged and stayed away from the towering colossus in droves. Even the fearsome Kelly Pavlik looked none too anxious for a battle after twice signing to fight him before pulling out with a series of regrettable health problems.

Saul Alvarez has the opposite problem of Williams. The hottest undefeated darling of Mexico needs his team to beat back the hordes of fighters trying to get at him, so it seemed an incredible convergence of good fortune and opportunity for Williams when he was chosen by Team Canelo for a splashy September 15th defense of the Alvarez WBC belt.

The Punisher

Williams had been struggling according to critics, but of course his critics had him struggling all through his stellar career. Even Beethoven had to endure such ham handed reviews such as “It bodes ill for Beethoven if he continues down his current path.”

Sadly, this potential fight of the year turned into a tragedy when Williams was paralyzed from the waist down after a motorcycle accident, squashing the big payday and the chance for Williams to upset the boxing applecart again.

Lineal light heavy champ Julio Gonzales recently passed from a motorcycle accident as did former champ Diego Corrales a few years back. Going back, fellow Georgian and HOFer Young Stribling was near the same age as Williams is now when he passed in a motorcycle accident, so Williams should thank his lucky stars for surviving with mental faculties intact.

Might even be time for Alvarez to make a test run with his 190 MPH Maserati and decide how much longer fate needs to be tempted.

Ladies and Gents, if you are married with a young family, sell your bike or at least mothball it until they can fend for themselves.

Willie Pep was similarly injured in a 1947 plane crash and told he would never box again, yet five months later he resumed the last 3rd of his stellar HOF career. Paul Williams is not likely to ever be voted into the HOF, but he did have his signature moment when he stood in the pocket all night to carve up Winky Wright like a Thanksgiving Day turkey. There were other great showings like his first round knockout of Carlos Quintana, outworking and outslugging Antonio Margarito in a firefight, and a spectacular give and take fight with current middleweight champ Sergio Martinez that had HBO salivating for the rematch in a classic series.

Alas, far too few American fighters or critics ever took to imposing giants as Jess Willard, Primo Carnera and Nikolay Valuev knew, much less a gangling southpaw giant who was a nightmare to fight, so Williams was left scrambling to find the best of the few opponents willing to test themselves against his formidable reach and work rate. He finishes with a stellar 41-2, 27 KO record.

I wish Paul Williams and his family all the best in his recovery and adjustment to his new life. He has been a great fighter and ambassador for boxing who has been greatly underrated.

Golden Boy Promotions has a well stocked stable of talented junior middleweights available for substitution, but then replacement James Kirkland fell out after citing ongoing shoulder problems. The 3rd choice, Victor Ortiz, had his jaw broken by the unheralded Josesito Lopez in what was supposed to be a mopup fight for Ortiz after his choreographed dive to the canvas in the Floyd Mayweather incident.

So after 3 fruitless rounds of scrambling for an opponent, Golden Boy finally did the right thing and yielded to the inevitability of fate by tapping the surging new boxing hero, Josesito Lopez.

Canelo vs Josesito
Canelo vs Josesito

Naturally boxing critics were instantly set howling in derision since the soon to be 29 years Lopez has never fought at junior middle, but then again he never fought at welterweight before pounding Ortiz into the hospital to ponder next year’s comeback with a rebuilt jaw. As you can see, Lopez looks to have some height and range over Alvarez, so he has plenty of time to pack on some additional pounds if needed.

Canelo is closing in on Floyd Mayweather Jr‘s undefeated record, 43-0, 26 KO. He’ll just have turned age 22 at the Lopez bout and goes to 41-0-1, 29 KO if he wins, so he’s already surpassed Mayweather in knockouts. They have been through a series of co-promotions together and Alvarez holds Mayweather’s old belt, so perhaps next year they meet in the ring for the final say so.

It’s been a troubling year for Golden Boy Promotions. Their #1 star Floyd Mayweather Jr is doing a stint in the federal pen as two of their young stars, Victor Ortiz and Amir Khan suffered humiliating knockouts by unsung underdogs. Their oldest star, Bernard Hopkins is going nowhere faster every day at age 47.

The good news for this card is that Mexican featherweight honchos, Jhonny Gonzalez and Daniel Ponce de Leon, will collide in what promises to plenty of old school slugging. Gonzalez should be the slight favorite, but he’ll have to throw in some nifty boxing for good measure against the southpaw De Leon.

Undefeated American heavyweight Seth Mitchell looks to earn respectability against fellow American Johnathon Banks who has been fighting in Germany on the Team Klitschko cards. All out sluggers Marcos Maidana and Jesus Soto Karrass lock up for contender status, so it’s a pretty good card for free viewing.

That’s September 15 at the MGM Hotel and Casino in Las Vegas for those interested in the manly art of self defense otherwise known as prize fighting.

A Failure to Fight–Rematch of Hopkins vs Dawson

Or alternately entitled, When Bad Chad Shrugged, Part II.

Officially the “event” is scheduled Saturday, April 28th at Boardwalk Hall in Atlantic City. Maybe a fight will break out this time, but the sad fact is that not many boxing fans wanted to see the original farce and fewer still likely to care about a rematch of what never was.

I predicted Dawson wouldn’t be getting any favors in the leadup article to the original, and sure enough the California commish overruled the referee decision of a 2nd round TKO of Hopkins to a NC, No Contest. The WBC ruled it a TD2, a Technical Draw, so Hopkins retained his title and million dollar purse and gets to reprise another day of moaning, crying, and rolling on the ring canvas for more millionaire pay.

Chad Dawson is largely blameless in the travesty save signing on to fight the geezer legend who more and more often doesn’t fancy a good fight anymore when he made his name against Tito Trinidad and Kelly Pavlik. All Dawson did was shrug his shoulders in an attempt to release himself from the clawing death grip Hopkins had placed him in after coming in hard with a UFC flying knee for his offense.

Hopkins is definitely NOT in the old school vein of his “role model,” Archie Moore, who swept the floor of his era with relevant heavyweight contenders in between defending his lightheavy title for a storied decade as one of the most revered P4P fighters in history. Moore was putting big guys on the canvas with their lights turned out, not moaning to the ref who could’ve cared less in an era where men were fighters and not wearing silly little Halloween fright masks into the ring like schoolboys looking for candy handouts.

You can read about the stark contrast between Archie Moore old school tough and skilled against the modern softie, Bernard Hopkins:

http://roberto00.wordpress.com/2010/05/03/listen-up-without-peer-the-one-the-only-archie-moore/

Tears for Punches

Tears for Punches

I’m generally not one to disparage a fighter for mere losses or one off poor performances, but Bernard Hopkins has been milking the boxing world for a while now. Dawson has to play along in the WBC fun and games if he is ever to return to his formerP4P status that he lost with the dubious stoppage by the Montreal ref on a minor cut in the Pascal fight.

Training with contraptions

Training with contraptions

What a 6-3 highly skilled boxer Dawson is doing ducking below his waist to avoid an old guy with no teeth in his mouth or punches in his mitts is something he and his trainer Ice John Scully will have to address if they ever hope to make Dawson the household name his skills and talents deserve.

You’ve been forewarned, so watch at your peril.

Battle of Two Sergies–Martinez vs Dzinzurik

Fresh off his fight of the year knockout of Paul Williams, WBC middleweight champ Sergio Martinez is at the zenith of his long career in his 15th year of boxing when he takes on a very tricky challenger, Sirhiy Dzinzurik, the undefeated WBO 154lb champ.

Maravilla

Maravilla

This is a much riskier fight for Martinez who couldn’t nail down a big money fight after his brilliant showings against Kelly Pavlik and Paul Williams than it is for Dzinzurik who his fighting for name recognition in spite of a stellar career.

The fight could be alternately titled The Big Risk vs The Big Step Up.

Or perhaps the tough Argentinian against the tough Ukrainian.

The Bad News is that Martinez is at an advanced age, 36, in what could be a very tough fight against a tricky southpaw, a pure boxer nicknamed the Razor. The Good News is that Martinez is a marvel in the ring. Maravilla is also a tricky a southpaw going up against a 35 yr old fighter making a big step up in class.

Dzyna/Razor

Dzyna/Razor

I expect a wonderfully technical fight with some unexpected twists. Martinez will be the favorite, but really, given the unknowns of this bout and the excellence of both boxers, this is a pickem for me, but, regardless one or the other will be picking up the WBC Diamond belt.

That’s next Saturday, March 12.

Main thing is to enjoy the show as both these guys are very underrated. 

Paul Williams vs Sergio Martinez-The Rematch

The stratospherically tall Paul Williams is set to challenge the newly minted WBC middleweight champ in a long anticipated rematch against Sergio Martinez this Saturday, November 11th at Boardwalk Hall, Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Play It Again, Sam

Play It Again, Sam

Martinez has managed to make himself into something of a sensation recently in spite of posting a disappointing 1-1-1 record over the past two years. The poor results show the limitations of using the record alone to judge a fighter and don’t reflect the excellent boxing skills and fighting spirit Sergio shows in the ring.

The loss was very close and disputed by many, and the draw was a travesty against honesty and competence in boxing when a whacked out Kermit Cintron should have been KTFO after taking the full count or at least DQed for arguing with the ref afterwards. The gang of officials who sanctioned and officiated the bout scrambled to find a single functioning brain cell between the lot of them to tell them what to do next before resuming the bout a farcical 5 minutes later, but that’s all water under the bridge for the new WBC champ coming off his signature win over the towering Kelly Pavlik.

The Argentinean seems to have attracted a significant American following the last couple of years because of his stellar fighting acumen, but perhaps more tellingly by his personal demeanor as an old school consummate gentleman with additional descriptors such as Hollywood handsome tagging along.

All that attention might raise the hackles of the perpetually underappreciated Paul Williams who has been struggling for meaningful fights, recognition, and the large purses that traditionally come with the type of success he’s had in his career thus far, 39-1, 27 KO. If riled, he must be hiding it well since he’s been virtually silent on the promotional end since the fight was announced while Martinez has garnered most of the press.

Williams got little credit for their first fight in spite putting up a great fight and coming away with the majority decision that some claim Martinez deserved. He followed that with another controversial win over Kermit Cintron who has become the King of Controversies. Cintron dove out of the ring during an exchange and hit floor, “apparently” unable to continue until he suddenly came to life to protest the fight’s stoppage much like the Martinez knockdown.

So, Williams is coming off a majority decision and then a technical decision against top ranked contenders and wondering what he has to do to get some recognition and a more comprehensive win.

Williams’ biggest problem besides being impossibly tall and talented is that he’s also a southpaw with a freakish reach making him a very awkward fight. Martinez is also a southpaw, and traditionally two lefties don’t make fan friendly fights though their first match had HBO raving for more. Williams did himself no favors with the public by demanding a 158 lb catchweight for this challenge which is just more catchweight silliness in boxing that lately seems to be catching on like a wave of the latest flu pandemic.

Thankfully their promoters finally got the contracts hammered out, so now it’s up to the fighters to take care of business in a definitive way on the cards that fans can get behind. I get the feeling that this fight is a grudge match for the two training teams if not the fighters themselves since Martinez’s team were vehement in their protest after losing the first fight. Martinez himself just flashed his trademark sunny smile and shrugged his shoulders knowing that he’d already been done in worse for the Cintron fight and that little could be done to change the outcome.

I personally thought Williams edged it, but boxing does itself no favors with perpetually poor refereeing and judging, such that close fights or unsporting behaviors can become contentiously controversial on no other basis save individual perceptions that the rules of boxing are not being followed for a sporting contest.

That’s what rematches and rubber matches were meant for, to straighten out the record, something boxing, ie, promoters and ABCs could better promote, but typically they are more interested in following up tough fights with easy walkovers to build up fragile fighter psyches rather than dicker over infinitesimal purse percentage splits in another tough fight.

The Trinkets

The Trinkets

So, here we are with two top lifetime welter/junior middles fighting at a 158lb catchweight with the WBC and the Ring middleweight titles on the line in what should be a pretty good scrap. Martinez also won the WBO belt when he dethroned Pavlik but was almost simultaneously stripped of that belt and his WBC junior middle belt afterwards, so Martinez is becoming painfully aware of the self serving capriciousness of the various ABC orgs, refs, and judges.

Ripped For Action
Ripped For Action

Reports initially indicated a possible weight problem with Martinez scaling near 180lbs, but in California, he is looking sharp and trimming down as he moves his conditioning up. Here’s a training pic some 2 weeks before the fight that shows a ripped Sergio at whatever his current weight is, so I suspect with the length of his camp, it should be no problem cutting weight.

Team Williams is apparently working on secret weapons and buried itself somewhere deep in Georgia not to be bothered by the press as I’ve heard scarcely a peep out of them. Williams has been much like Kelly Pavlik and Vitali Klitschko in sticking to his longtime trainer, in this case one George Peterson, whereas Martinez seems to have outside training input at the Robert Garcia Gym in Oxnard at the start of camp.

I personally feel both Pavlik and Williams could stand some additional training input from quality outside sources, but it’s their call and loyalty is an admirable trait.

In their last fight Martinez was able to utilize ring movement to direct the stalking Williams around the ring before using his quickness to leap in with damaging shots and combinations before moving out again. It worked OK overall as a counter to Williams’ reach, but it looked to me like Martinez tired down the stretch from fighting such a large, awkward opponent with such an energy sapping fight plan.

The other option would be to stand more at ring center and take the fight directly to Williams.

That would fit perfectly into Williams’ fighting style which has been to take the fight to whomever he’s fighting, softening them up with a blizzard of punches, often delivered in combination from different angles with both hands. Williams has a lot of experience fighting high profile lefties now, a record 4-1, 2KO against Sharmba Mitchell, Carlos Quintana, Winky Wright, and Sergio Martinez, so he has to be confident that he can handle Martinez again.

Remember, Williams did much, much better in his rematch against Quintana, avenging his only loss with a monstrous KO that Williams would love to replicate for this fight to avoid another controversy not of his making.

Williams is an aspiring young man who wishes to please the fans and doesn’t always fight to his strengths which is using his spectacular reach and work rate to overwhelm fighters at a distance. He willingly allows himself to exchange in close which is where the most realistic chance of beating him comes, and though he usually gets the better of those exchanges, a quick fisted combination southpaw puncher like Martinez can pose a danger and make him look clumsier than he is, which is one of the reasons the public has not flocked to him. The other being that Williams is not a dynamic personality with dynamic ring persona. He’s more in the mold of Joe Louis, another small town Southern country boy going quietly about his work to beat every fighter he encounters which keeps his record shining without casting any limelight on himself.

Though Williams and Martinez exchanged opening knockdowns in their first encounter, neither fighter is a one punch artist, but rather a combination, accumulative, attrition type of puncher. It’s possible someone’s chin could crack eventually in spite of both proving to be very durable fighters if the pace gets ramped up to what I suspect it to be with both looking harder for the KO this go round.

I’m guessing the odds will be fairly even come fight night with Williams being a slight favorite, but I have a sneaking suspicion that training preparations will be key in this fight and I have no inside insight there. From the outside, it looks like Martinez has been making all the right moves, but he has a huge obstacle to overcome since Williams is a much quicker, a more dynamic and awkward fighter than the orthodox Kelly Pavlik, a tall powerhouse that Martinez was able to move inside on at will thanks to flowing eye cuts that kept Pavlik blinded for the latter rounds of their fight.

If the fight is near as exciting and as closely contested as the first, I imagine HBO would be willing to put on the rubber, so I’m expecting a good, maybe a great, very tight fight, but you might not want to risk betting the farm in this one unless you enjoy chewed off nails and split judges cards.

Good Lookin' Undercard Too!

Good Lookin’ Undercard Too!

The undercard is intriguing with an undefeated two division champ, Zsolt Erdei, 31-0, 17 KO, former title challenger Tony “The Tiger” Thompson, 34-2, 22KO, and undefeated middleweight contender Fernando Guerrero,19-0, 15KO, fighting, but unfortunately against TBA type of journeymen. Still, these guys may be relatively unknown, but it’s a good opportunity to showcase their skills for future title challenges.

Pick’em, Danno-Winner Takes All……..

 

Como se dice, "Adios, Amigo?"

Como se dice, “Adios, Amigo?”

 

 

Ward vs Green, The Prefight:

Undefeated Andre Ward defends his shiny new WBA belt against replacement Allan Green as part of the ongoing Super Six Tourney this coming Saturday.

Ward vs Green, simple, right? Just basic American single syllable names in a simple basic rockem-sockem American style fight, right?

Let’s take a look.

Green was the replacement for Jermaine Taylor who chose to withdraw from the tourney after being knocked out so devastatingly by Arthur Abraham. Hard to believe that Allan Green has kicked around as a pro now for some 8 yrs now without ever beating a top ten contender or receiving a single title shot, but there it is, the dilemma of the modern American fighter, nibbling around at the fringe, darting among the shadows.

Andre Ward

Andre Ward

The Ward challenge represents a quantum leap in class and opportunity against another American oddity, America’s last Olympic gold medalist in boxing from the 2004 team. Andre Ward was supposed to be another Golden Boy, a 20 yr old phenom turning pro in the golden hills of California with a sunny, smiling disposition borne of golden Olympic credentials, yet he too has seemingly had a modern American shadow cast on his career, nibbling at the fringe primarily in California.

In the biggest fights of his career, 3 of his last 4 will have taken place in Ward’s hometown of Oakland, California, perhaps a testament of the residual weight Olympic Gold carries in these barren American boxing days. Currently the hometown is vastly favored in the Super Six Tourney, 5-0, so the hometown advantage is quite distinct. Green has also campaigned mostly in his home state of Oklahoma, but he has traveled to distant locales within the US and even made it Puerto Rico for his biggest fight, Edison Miranda, whom he dropped a 10 rd decision to.

Oddly enough, Andre Ward has never once fought in Las Vegas, much less Nevada, nor has he appeared in Madison Square Garden, very unusual for such a uniquely all American creation. In comparison, Green did make Las Vegas on a Friday night undercard as a 4 rd novice, but otherwise has stayed away from the glittering lights.

So, the oddsmakers will be making Ward the big favorite with him coming off his biggest win against the top ranked Mikkel Kessler combined with the glittering amateur credentials and hometown advantage.

Ward does have a strike against him though, he’s also coming off of reconstructive knee surgery after the Kessler bout. We saw an example of how devastating knee problems can be a few weeks back in the Yuri Foreman defense against Miguel Cotto, so until the knee is properly tested, there will be a concern to any players as to the odds they’re getting.

Allan Green

Allan Green

Allan Green has had far more serious medical problems though, having had most of his colon removed back in 2007, a major debilitating operation. He seems to have rebounded nicely with 5-0, 3 KO record against fringe contender types, but as mentioned, as yet still untested against top opposition.

So the bout has some intrigue born of both fighters needing a testing to see what they have left. Andre Ward represents the boxer in this bout with his unblemished 21-0, 13 KO record. He was rumored to have a soft chin that needed soft opposition coming up, but his chin was intact with solid performances against big punching Miranda and Kessler, so perhaps those rumors were unfounded.

Ward is meeting a huge, hard punching fighter in Green who turned pro at the lightheavy limit and has been as high as 181 lbs, but Green made a career decision in 2005 to campaign in the super middle class, so here he is, 29-1, 20 KO, feeling neglected and hungry for opportunity which finally seems to be unlocking it’s doors to him.

As to the tactics, well, Ward is going to use movement to keep Green moving and box him in and out much like he did Miranda and Kessler. Green is going to box to prevent himself from looking bad on the cards, and setting traps, looking for the big counter or hands down moment to deliver his bomb. It should be a decent technical fight at very least, and it could be a dramatic fight if Green can solve Ward’s footwork and put him in some trouble.

Logic dictates a Ward win, but I’m going against all logic here because I feel Green will be in the condition of his life and has some untapped potential that might well prove to be America’s newest Superman’s kryptonite.

So, it’s Green for me unless some breaking news comes out that would alter my pick. I just got that funny feelin’.

6/21/10- Post Fight Review:

Well, excuses are like gas, everyone has some, but it was well noted in the media that Green may have overtrained, and, indeed, that appears to be the case as Green as the bigger, allegedly stronger fighter having been as high as cruiserweight early in his career, turned up as weak and meek and tiny as a newborn kitty.

Punch Swap

Punch Swap

It could be that the 80% bowel resectioning has weakened him enough to be exposed at the elite level, or maybe the hype of the interviews coming into his first major event took a mental and physical toll on Green as he only weighed 166 after previously being at the 168 lb supermiddle limit in his last two fights. He certainly had the style, the punch, and the reach to be a major danger, but, Ward tossed a blanket on his tiger and smothered him inside, near suffocating Green by the end.

I’m reading in the Ring blog where the author acknowledges the boredom of the bout, but justifying it on thrilling technical merit, but I’m sorry, but that’s complete hogwash. It was a fight that was 90% contested inside, nose to nose, grabbing and tossing out popcorn and kisses for punches. Nobody was ever buzzed, staggered, or more than barely mussed from the best punches.

That reminds me of a host of great inside work done by Dick Tiger who was The Man slaying a landscape of monsters in his day. Thinking also of scarcely remembered crown jewels of boxing such as Griffith/Paret III and Frazier/Quarry I & II if you want to see the way the all timers do nose to nose blasting demolition against prime hungry man eating predators.

For me, the best fights of the super six series have been Froch/Kessler who brought some old school technique and toughness into that donnybrook, and Abraham/Taylor which featured Taylor in the physical condition of his life working Abraham as hard as he’s ever been worked in his career to give it all up with one of the most dramatic one punch KOs you can ever witness.

Moreover, not that hometown cooking played  a role in this final result, the hometown fighters are 6-0 in the series. I do take issue with the scoring as Green was game and fighting even up with Ward through the first 5 rds before his boiler ran out of steam. He operated at around 20% capacity after that, just using his skills and experience to hold on for the big Home Run Shot Heard Round the World that never came.

Queuing up as we speak, perhaps Froch/Abraham can deliver a Fight of the Year classic, with some possibilities for Ward/Dirrell and Green/Kessler.

Yes they can…….keep hope alive……..and never say die when one punch changes everything.

Ratings, Ring Ratings & Good Sport

by Bobby Mac

Now that the Floyd Mayweather Jr vs Shane Mosley fight has been settled in a definitive way with a wide unanimous decision by Mr. Money, the next raging debate is the welter and the P4P ranks by Ring Magazine.

Mayweather Connects

Mayweather Connects

Now, ratings are a strange thing. Almost nobody agrees with them. Even within the most widely used bodies that actually do the ratings which are done by consensus tallies, quite often there are pronounced splits leading to plurality consensus rather than an ideal comprehensive consensus.

My personal opinion is that the further from the first ranking the rank becomes, the more meaningless it becomes as objectivity and subjectivity tend to blur into a large fuzzy splot of consciousness more akin to debating the number of angels who could dance on the head of a pin as used to be all the rage by past century’s greatest intellects.

Often there is a consensus among the public as to who the top 2-3 spots are even if they disagree on the specific order.

Boxrec does the earliest updates, literally by the next day after every fight usually. It’s all done by the computer programming where an editor enters in the official results and out spits the fighter’s new point totals and ranking, making it the most objective of the rating’s system. The criteria used in the programming must have been created by Rube Goldberg’s grandson, a dense network of points for this and that and the other and points against that, this, and any other thing they can think of.

For a more detailed explanation of this impenetrable maze than this poor scribe can come up with, go knock your eyes out here: http://boxrec.com/media/index.php/BoxRec_Ratings_Description.

Before M & M(Mayweather vs Mosley), Pacquiao was the #1 welter and Mayweather #2 in Boxrec. After M & M, the computer swapped their positions, even though Manny beat the bejabbers out of the guy who beat Mosley a couple years back, Cotto, and then drummed all the fight out of a fighter with near the same rank as Mosley, Clottey. Go figure as it’s all mumbo jumbo to me.

Pacquiao Does the Business

Pacquiao Does the Business

In theBoxrec P4P ranks, strangely enough Bernard Hopkins has had a stranglehold on Boxrec in spite of beating nobody of note since his singular Kelly Pavlik victory ages ago. It seems Boxrec rejiggered it’s programming in a dramatic way, as now Hopkins has lost both his P4P and Lightheavy top spots when his point totals reduced by a third. Try knocking off a third of your bank account to see how that works in the real world.

Somewhere Rube Goldberg is beaming like a proud parent.

Fightnews has a comprehensive rankings of the WBC, WBA, IBF, and WBO that they supplement with their own rankings in each division. There is no key as to when they do their updates, but they had Manny as #1 and Mayweather #2 before M & M, and nothing has changed.

So, the BIG DADDY of rankings has just updated it’s own after taking a vote from a myriad of sources, presumably all “boxing experts,” so let’s take a look at the latest Ring updates.

Like Boxrec, they swapped out Manny’s #1 spot with #2 Mayweather, so that Mr. Money is their new #1 welter. To quote Nigel Collins, Ring Editor in Chief, “The debate among members of THE RING’s Ratings Advisory Panel concerning who should be No. 1 pound for pound was fairly evenly divided between Manny Pacquiao and Floyd Mayweather,” Collins said. “Manny and Floyd could very well be considered No. 1A and No. 1B. However, the tricky thing about the pound-for-pound ratings is that they are much more subjective than the divisional ratings, which are objective and based on results within the division.” 

Really? Well, let’s take an objective look at their very own rankings.

Mayweather has a win over their #4, Mosley, and that’s it. He hasn’t fought any other currently ranked Ring fighter.

Now compare to Paquiao, who knocked out the guy who last beat Mosley before Mayweather, Miguel Cotto, Ring #5, who did it without the hysterics of almost being knocked out like happened to Mayweather. Pacquiao also pitched a brutal shutout over the Ring #6, Clottey, so his body of work is double that of Mayweather as far as Ring rankings go.

So much for Ring objectivity in the welter ranks, so let’s move to the P4P rankings.

No change in Ring P4P ranks with Pacquiao still #1 and Mayweather #2, but wait, there’s more! Per Mr. Collins, P4P ratings are more subjective, and he’s right!

Manny has a win and draw over Ring #3, Marquez, whereas Floyd has a win over #3, Marquez, and #5, Mosley.

Well, it all becomes too much of a beauty contest for me to take seriously, which is why I tend to enjoy my little sport with the rankings. Interesting to note though that there are two new entrants in the P4P ranks that coincide with my personal list I compiled a month back, Sergio Martinez, and Pongsaklek Wonjongkam. Now I haven’t updated my own list yet as I was more interested in looking at the ranking processes of three of the most widely read rankings.

Not being on a deadline with an editor in chief breathing fire down my shorts, I can afford to wait a bit for the fur to settle out from this last tear-up. 

1 M Pacquiao
2 Timothy Bradley
3 L Bute
4 P Williams
5 JM Lopez
6 Poonsawat Kratingdaenggym
7 Pongsaklek Wonjongkam
8 W Klitschko
9 V Klitschko
10 F Mayweather

I reinstalled Mayweather to #10, which is a shame after his stellar comeback from a certain knockout where he showed heart never exhibited by him before. Thing is Mosley was not nearly so highly ranked by me as in Ring and he almost had Mr. Money out of there. Then the spector of Mayweather backing off the scratch line of the 3/13 date that was the first concession Pacquioa granted him and backing out of the 90% drug testing concessions Manny granted him.

I also hated to bump my newly installed Sergio Martinez, but I cannot ignore the overall performance Mr. Money put on.

He’s trying to sneak in the backdoor though, so I’m gonna give him the backdoor on my own list for now and see if he can work his way up. Both my top two guys have strongly expressed an interest in fighting him as well as #4 Williams, as well as several other prime fighters of note. Prime ranked fighters in his divisions being the key point of respect if Mr. Money wants to claim he’s in the driver’s seat.

Enough of the old man tour!

Preview of Pavlik vs Martinez

By Bobby Mac

A very intriguing middleweight title defense is coming up this Saturday when Kelly “The Ghost” Pavlik defends his Ring, WBC, and WBO titles against the WBC junior middleweight champion, Sergio “Maravilla” Martinez.

Martinez was the late stand-in for the ailing Kelly Pavlik when Paul William’s expected title challenge to Pavlik at the end of 2009 fell out. Martinez lost a majority decision to Williams in a spirited nontitle middleweight bout that Martinez supporters claim he won. Regardless of the decision, Sergio Martinez won over a lot of fans with his performance, enough to catch the attention of the newly slighted Kelly Pavlik looking to regain his monumental reputation in the boxing world.

Pavlik is making his 6th defense of his titles that he won the hard way back in 2007 when he beat The Man who beat The Man, Jermain Taylor, who Kelly whacked out in the 7th round in thrilling bout. Since then, he has struggled with a career threatening accident when he put his hand through a pane of glass, then was near death in a reaction to treatment from a staphylococcus infection in his hand.

Kelly "The Ghost" Pavlik

Kelly “The Ghost” Pavlik

Pavlik also struggled somewhat in the ring, unable to replicate thrilling performances against Edison Miranda and Jermain Taylor before taking a near shutout drubbing at the hands Bernard Hopkins in a Light Heavyweight non title catchweight fight. Still, in spite of the adversity, here he is in his 6th defense against the biggest challenge of his career since he first challenged Jermain Taylor.

Sergio Martinez is a fast handed, southpaw Argentinean just now coming into his own at age 35. He will be giving up some significant size and strength against the huge Pavlik, but size and strength is not the Martinez stock in trade although he is plenty big enough. Martinez is a boxer reliant on speed and angles to earn his wins and operates out of a tricky southpaw stance.

Martinez trades with Paul Williams

The Bruising

It’s hard to know how Pavlik will adjust to fighting a southpaw since he has no significant experience with a southpaw at this high level. He was in training to fight Paul Williams who is also a southpaw, so Pavlik will at least have had some previous training accumulated. Likewise, Martinez has no experience against such a big strong, prime, heavyhanded fighter as is Pavlik. Williams was as tall, but more fast handed boxer than slugger and not nearly so physically strong.

It’s that unknown factor that both bring into the fight that makes it so intriguing to me. Usually I have a sense of how the fight is likely to unfold, but I’m coming up blank on this other than to note Pavlik is not likely to be outboxing Martinez who in turn is not likely to be outslugging Pavlik. Kelly should be the favorite, but perhaps not by so much.

I’m hoping for a classic slugger vs boxer fight of the year candidate that both gentlemen are fully capable of delivering. May the best man win.