Monstrous Chinese Superheavyweights Invade America

It was a long time coming before the first ever Chinese heavyweight boxer would make his American pro debut from the Peoples Republic of China, ie ruling National Communist Party as opposed to the vestigial Republic of China, ie Taiwan to plainly state saber rattling, missile splashing geo-political distinctions. Last night at the storied Fisherman’s Wharf of San Francisco, California, all seven foot and 300 or so pounds of Taishan Dong swung into action to knock out Alex Rozman, a novice journeyman with an nonthreatening losing record. 

7' Taishan Dong

7′ Taishan Dong

It was something of a stealth debut for the little known Dong who is named after a holy Taoist mountain of Mt. Taishan. He may find his fleeting accolades soon shadowed by another supersized countryman come August 8th in Fallon Nevada when Chinese Olympic Superheavyweight Silver Medalist Zhang Zhilei makes a much more touted debut against novice Matt McKinney, 0-0-1, 0 KO and also currently ranking among near the last grouping of the 1000 or so Boxrec listed heavyweights. The stellar amateur accomplishments of Zhilei and the high level professional training he has received cannot be immediately matched by Dong without further development.

But the good news is that the Chinese peoples and international boxing community will have some new favorites or villains to pick from. Dong’s background is in various martial arts, most notably kick boxing like the Klitschko brothers who have infuriated, re: emasculated the more traditional mainstream American and British heavyweight fans with their dominance in the ring. How Chinese fighters will be received is unknown, but the most touted professional Chinese fighter is currently Olympic gold medalist Zou Shiming who fights out of Macao, China for Top Rank, currently at 5-0, 1 KO. He trains with Freddie Roach at the Wild Card Gym in Los Angeles though and may eventually make an American debut in the future, but since he’s a flyweight, he won’t catch on like the heavyweights might well do.
I know little of Zhang Zhilhei’s boxing skills other than he defeated current New Zealander up and coming contender Joseph Parker in the 2008 Olympics in Bejing. The notoriously “political” International Olympic Committee always reserve medals for the host nation’s best boxers, so make of it what you will.
Making a Splash in the Big Apple

Making a Splash in the Big Apple

The 31 year old Zhilei is definitely cast in the mold of a giant, looking much bigger here than his listed 6-6, 240 claimed pounds as he dwarfs his “advisor” Evander Holyfield. He is also looks to be quite personable which may endear him to American fans, but he’s also a southpaw who may soon be flattening hapless American prospects which may not endear him at all to flag waving Americans, but it is what it is, currently a fragile construct of modern international politics that would allow these types of immigrations to take place.

The plan seems to move Zhilei along smartly with maybe a title shot in 3 years or so around 34-35 years of age. Looking forward to seeing these latest Chinese developments for sure. True boxing fans are always game for more good fighters to come along to blast some much needed infusion into a stagnating sport, so we shall see what shall be.
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