Tag Archives: bermane stiverne

“Deyonce” Wilder Defends WBC Alabama Title against Bermane Stiverne

I wasn’t going to bother with this WBC farce, but the comedy value is just too temptingly great to pass up.

Yup, “Deyonce” Wilder Defends his WBC Alabamy Mudflats Title against Bermane Stiverne in Barclays Center, Brooklyn, New York, of all places, Saturday, November 4th. Expect the place to be heavily papered in free and reduced value tickets since he can’t draw more than a few flies in his home state of Alabama where he usually can be found fighting the latest TBA on short notice that Stiverne represents for a bag of peanuts and popcorn.

Yup, the WBC Alabamy belt represents the highest achievement of American heavyweights since his debut 9 years ago.

Oh, he’ll moan about phantom drug test failings, something that Stiverne himself is guilty of in the most incremental way of a fail possible when you understand that 90% of the American population couldn’t pass modern day drug testing including the kids who are so addled after being drugged up by modern docs and psychologists that the American culture is ready to implode yet again. So it ain’t like dear Deyonce is some kind of holy warrior only fighting clean fighters when in fact he’s been fighting guys who nominally failed drug tests like Stiverne who couldn’t make a top 20 ranking in Ring or Boxrec, but King can pay the WBC to make him a mandatory opponent in spite of the complete lack of accomplishments after he lost his title to Deyonce.

The 39 year old Stiverne is just a single fight above being retired after their last fight almost 3 years years ago, and that against a journeyman where he hardly distinguished himself. Let’s face it, at this stage of Don King boxing is just a hobby and Stiverne is perfect for him in that he’s about a lazy a ring presence as ever existed. Everything about his first fight with Deyonce stinks as most Don King fights do when Stiverne had to be admitted to a hospital afterward suffering from “severe dehydration”, a condition almost impossible to achieve in heavyweights from never needing to drop weight to make a division limit. Moreover, their fight like most are in climate controlled environments, and like most heavyweight bouts, their’s was slow paced because neither has ever in traditionally good shape because neither has ever aspired to fight the best in their division.

Stiverne turned pro in July 2005 and Deyonce in November of 2008, and allowing the typical 3 years of heavyweight development before fighting their first touted prospect or fringe contender types, Stiverne only shows two wins over former contender Chris Arreola in 2013-2014, 8 years AFTER his debut. Wilder made that jump in 2014 over former champ long past any credible ranking, Siarhoi Liakhovich in 2014, 6 years after his debut, and mostly fringe contenders since if even that. The Ring and Boxrec top ten heavyweights have never been targeted because in general those types of top 10 fighters tend to fight each other. Since both Stiverne and Wilder are basically fringe contender types who have made a decent living holding a corrupted WBC belt, their circle of fighters has been limited to the fringes.

This promises more of the same, and a well deserved pittance for an orchestrated heavyweight title fight for the WBC Alabama title. Deyonce has never fought much less beat a legit Ring or Boxrec top ten heavy. The list of top 10 names he has failed to even bother negotiations with would include a who’s who of top Ring and Boxrec contenders over the past 10 years since his debut that would only partially include:

RING:

Wladimir Klitschko
Vitali Klitschko
Ruslan Chagaev
Alexander Povetkin
Nikolay Valuev
Sultan Ibragimov
Samuel Peter
Oleg Maskaev
Juan Carlos Gomez
Alexander Dimitrenko
Eddie Chambers
David Haye
Denis Boytsov
Tony Thompson
Tomasz Adamek
Robert Helenius
Kubrat Pulev
Tyson Fury

Current BOXREC:

1 ➡ Anthony Joshua
2 ➡ Alexander Povetkin
3 ➡ Deontay Wilder
4 ⬆ 1 Luis Ortiz
5 ⬇1 Kubrat Pulev
6 ➡ Tony Bellew
7 ➡ Joseph Parker
8 ➡ Christian Hammer
9 ➡ Dillian Whyte
10 ➡ Adam Kownacki
11 ➡ Jarrell Miller
12 ⬆ 1 Dominic Breazeale
13 ⬆ 1 Malik Scott
14 ⬆ 1 Charles Martin
15 ⬆ 1 Andy Ruiz Jr
16 ⬆ 1 Johann Duhaupas
17 ⬇5 Lucas Browne
18 ➡ Eric Molina
19 ➡ Carlos Takam
20 ⬆ 1 David Haye

As you can see, he has at least fought and beat the current boxrec #13 and #18, hardly a Murderers Row in the Pantheon of all time feared heavyweights, and that’s it. Yet somehow in today’s heavyweight division where most fighters tend to avoid their fellow top ranked peers in the weakest heavyweight era in history, this 32 year old marshmallow has somehow wormed his way into a high Ring and Boxrec rating on dint of a long career @37-0, 36 KO where 3/4ths of his opponents weren’t above a 300th Boxrec rating.

As to the fight, I’d expect Stiverne to get hit plenty as he did last fight, but this time they’ll call for an early stoppage to save Deyonce for the only big fight of his career where he might clear $5 million, and that’s over in England against Anthony Joshua who’s the hottest thing going in boxing these days. Of course Stiverne could catch Deyonce as he did last time, only harder, but I expect no favors for him by the judges or the ref. Watch it and weep for the good ol’ days when men were men and American heavies the real champs with nobody to dispute them. 

Deontay Wilder Finally Steps Up Vs Bermane Stiverne

Freshly crowned WBC heavyweight champion Bermane Stiverne (24-1-1, 21 KOs) defends against his mandatory, Deontay Wilder (32-0, 32 KOs) this Saturday, January 17 at the MGM in Las Vegas. Unfortunately for boxing, more specifically American boxing, Wilder is only a modest prospect by his limited achievements, yet by hook and crook has managed through dubious rankings in the WBC and shady maneuverings at Al Haymon/Golden Boy News of the Ring World to become top rated contender.

Perhaps more telling has been the tepid promotional push since the fight was announced. That this deal is a backroom deal seems more and more apparent as it flies under the usual radar of hyped American heavyweight title fights. The bigger story is news that Golden Boy Promotions has given up his interest in Al Hayman signed fighters and settled his lawsuit against Richard Schaefer the week before this fight.

In contrast look for the planned Wladimir Klitschko/Bryant Jennings fight at Barclays in Brooklyn to be very well promoted as a legitimate heavyweight challenge by a worthy American against the growing legacy of the long time champ. Though the monetary terms have been agreed to, the other big boxing story is the advances Roc Nation has made by the recent signing of Jennings which may complicate the final details.

Yes,

Yes, “It” Happens!

The Don King promoted Stiverne manage to earn his limited chops and the WBC title by beating long time contender Chris Arreola, once in 2013 and again in 2014 for the belt. Arreola himself had something of a specious record after never having beat a top ten contender, the ultimate scourge of the last decade of faint hearted US heavyweight prospects and their promoters. The last US Olympic boxing medalist, Wilder, was last seen buried in California on the undercard of little known IBF Welter champ Shawn Porter when he defended against even less known British contender Kell Brook. In spite of Wilder’s bronze medal in 2008 and perfect 34-0, 34 KO record, only a couple dozen fans were in the seats of the Stubb Hub to watch him pad out his choreographed streak against long time journeyman Jason Gavern.

Mutt & Jeff Monkeyshines

Mutt & Jeff Monkeyshines

The physical aesthetics of this fight are something akin to a modern day rendition of the old Mutt & Jeff cartoon given the sleek 6-7 tattooed physiology of 29 year old Wilder in contrast to the stubby blubber of the 36 year old Stiverne, generously listed at 6-2 on boxrec in spite obviously challenging the 5-11 mark. In a styles make fights sport, the fight becomes a real puzzle since nobody knows what kind of style Wilder will use since he’s never faced any fighter near the danger of the limited Stiverne who can easily be outboxed in the early going. Does Wilder have the stamina to go the distance against a tough guy like Stiverne? Does he have the power to knock him out? Does Wilder have the chin to stand up to the inevitable shots landed on him? Does he have the innate moxie to know when to move and box and when to stand and land?

We know what Stiverne brings but in spite of 34 fights we don’t know what kind of fighter Wilder really is other than heavily protected and we may not find out given the shaky promotional natures of Don King and Al Hayman for whom fairly officiated fights are an anathema. This is a roll of unknown dice for the public, however there’s little doubt that young Wilder represents the future American boxing interests as opposed to the unheralded Haitian Stiverne who can never generate a decent sized purse unless the unspeakable happens and he knocks out Wilder. Then he would have to sign to fight Wladimir Klitschko in a unification bout, not likely given his promoter Don King’s reluctance to risk one of his last meal tickets.

Speculation aside, the model for this “event” is likely found in the first Michael Dokes vs Mike Weaver confrontation when the unsung Weaver was stopped controversially in the first round in spite of having all of his faculties just because he took some hard punches as was always his style. Naturally Don King secured the rematch which did nothing to settle the controversy with the draw result.

Stiverne is the closest heavyweight to the Weaver style today and there is no historical parallel to the limitations of Wilder, so the big question is whether the ref will favor Wilder or not. Regardless, I don’t see these guys going the distance and the potential for controversy is about as high as it can get for a fight.

 

Historic First~Bermane Stiverne vs Chris Arreola For WBC Crown

“Racial” as well as boxing history is guaranteed to be made when Bermane Stiverne and Chris Arreola fight for the vacated WBC heavyweight title Saturday, May 10th at the Galen Center in Los Angeles, California. Stiverne is Haitian born and Arreola is Mexican American Los Angeles born, neither racial demographic having ever held a heavyweight title before, but, barring a draw or double disqualification, one most certainly will after the smoke clears in what should be a huge battle for the honor as it should be in every fight.

Most boxing fans could give two hoots or a hollor about racial demographics unless it’s one of their own fighting for glory. They’d rather get behind a good fight that this promises to be. The WBC wanted to reprise the historical event deep in Mexico, but that was an obvious no go, so instead Stiverne, 23-1-1, 20 KOs, will rematch Arreola, 36-3, 31 KO, yet again in California. First go round Stiverne put up the best fight of his career, knocking down Arreola, breaking his nose, and otherwise staying in command down the stretch to cop the unanimous decision.

Since then Stiverne has been inactive while waiting for the boxing politics to play out for this opportunity. Arreola looked uncharacteristically serious in a concussive comeback of his own when he knocked out Al Haymon’s touted heavyweight contender Seth Mitchell in the first round. Both fighters have reportedly been in training since their first fight over a year ago in anticipation of this opportunity.

First Go Round

First Go Round

The paunchy 35 year old Stiverne may not look the part, but he has surprising power when he lands his big punch, a game changer. He’s too slow and lethargic for the purist, yet also quite relaxed with decent boxing skills and durability that have served him well. The 33 year old Arreola may be the goofiest, ugliest, funniest looking fat kid in any room, but he’s got predatory footwork and aggression with plenty of his own power that defines his all action pressure style. In shape given the nature of the stakes with his experience and held in his hometown, I do favor him slightly to win this thing.

Main thing going is the old school contrast of styles and power that will crown the new WBC champ, so it’s a good thing for everyone but Wlad Klitschko, the holder of every other heavyweight bauble, belt, and title under the sun. He wasn’t invited to this party, but he may be down the road when he gets a little older and longer on the tooth.

Be a great fight on ESPN that should drown out the usual ball sports on the TV down at the bar, so no excuses to miss this puppy.