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The Tyson Fury Show Makes American Debut

The widely acclaimed and equally reviled British heavyweight, Tyson Fury, makes his American network debut with a delayed Showtime broadcast from historic York Hall at Bethnal Green, London.

Rich Super Power vs Tyson Fury

Rich Super Power vs Tyson Fury

The undefeated, 12-0, 9 KO, Rich “Super” Power is the emergency replacement after previous selections fell out. This will be Power’s 4th bout this year, his last being 6 weeks ago, so he’s been an active fighter. Weighing in at a career low 221lbs, Power looks like he’s been in training as most fighters should be in case an opportunity of a lifetime comes along. At age 30 with a total of 26 rounds in the bank in 12 fights, it’s safe to say that Power counts on power as the defining element of his arsenal.

With an almost identical record of 11-0, 9 Kos, on paper it may seem they are equally matched prospects, but the 22 yr old Fury has been in with considerably stiffer competition, winning his first belt when he beat Big John McDermott for the English title last year and defending it with a knockout in the rematch this year.

Tyson's Fury

Tyson’s Fury

Fury comes from a longstanding family of Irish Travelers whose bareknuckled genealogy goes back a ways. His father, John Fury, also was a gloved boxer for a spell and apparently has the biggest influence in calling the shots in his son’s career. In short, Fury was destined from birth to be involved in some form or another of the Fury family fighting tradition, and made quite a splash with the public from the point of his debut forward.

As one of the most well known British fighters, on that front alone the Fury express has been quite the success story. He struggled mightily with hand problems and a new trainer after winning the English title, but may be righting himself by returning to his original trainer, his uncle Hughie I believe, with the result being his signature fight to date, the knockout of McDermott in a rousing rematch performance.

Not much is known of Power who’s largely been confined to small club fights in Michigan, but Tyson Fury’s bouts have all been televised, so it’s easy to pick up his strengths and weaknesses as a fighter.

He was born premature as the story goes, a single pounder who grew into a massive 6-9 stature, weighing in at 263 lbs for this fight. He’s always had a soft, poorly conditioned look to him, yet handled the 12 round Championship distance in the first McDermott fight as the stronger man at the finish, and he moves well with fast hands for such a big man.

As an offensively styled fighter, he gives plenty of openings for his opponents, but his chin has proven to be sound at this level and nobody has really been able to exploit any of his defensive lapses to hurt him and take away his bread and butter offense. Of course, the most damning evidence of a glaring weakness is the youtube clip of him almost decking himself with his own uppercut, something his critics have howled in delight over.

Fury is a very brash, but very amiable young man very much full of himself in a compelling, charismatic way that draws much attention to anything he does. With a twinkle of the mick in his eyes, he reminds me a bit of the playfulness of a young Cassius Clay who could say the most outrageous things that only piqued public interest.

Fury of course has quite a climb just to reach the foot of the pinnacle the legendary Ali rests on, but he’s one of the most interesting heavyweight prospects in some time, so I thought him worth a shout for anyone trying to find a ray of hope for the future of the heavyweight division.

Fury only recently horned his way into the announcement that David Haye would be defending his WBA title against Audley “A-Force” Harrison in an all British showdown, calling the match “a farce.” Perhaps more prophetically, he opined, “I’d definitely put up a better fight (against Haye) than Harrison. I reckon I could beat Audley Harrison, to be honest. But it’s about getting the chance to prove it.”

If Audley lands another Sprott Hail Mary on the vulnerable chin of Haye, does this mean a Fury defense could be the trump card of the fickle finger of Fate early next year?

Veeerily interesting me thinks, but first things first for young Fury.

Somebody is gonna have to knock Fury off his perch to put a dent in his climb, so is Rich “Super” Power that fighter?

Stay tuned for the results.

Putting the !POW! in Power

Putting the !POW! in Power

Listen Up: Without Peer, The One & The Only, Archie Moore

by Bobby Mac

First off, a disclaimer needs to be noted. I have always like Archie Moore before ever consciously thinking about what he meant to boxing.

It came about naturally just as the sun comes up in the east and sets in the west.

I mean, what was there not to like about this smiling, affable, congenial, just about every friendly descriptor that could be applied to him up to and including beaming man. Yes, Archie Moore as often as not was literally beaming good vibes, happiness, confidence, just about every positive descriptor that can be conjured and beaming them to every corner of the earth.

“Now, hold on right there podnah,” I can hear you saying, “how old are you, and this Moore fella, was he a saint who boxed or what?”

The Student & The Teacher

The Student & The Teacher

Well, I tell you that The Ol’ Mongoose proved that age was irrelevant, and yes, Archie could be said to be a saint who boxed, a wise sage who boxed, a desperately hungry man who boxed, an assassin who boxed, a grandfather, father, husband, and uncle who boxed. He was all these descriptors and more.

“Oh, come on.” you say, “You’re just gonna launch into another the good ol’ days being better than now. Today’s boxers are better trained and better athletes and this ol’ git would be lucky to be ranked.”

How about I recount to you a familiar story, the story of Bernard Hopkins who has often compared himself to Archie Moore? How many fights has he won after turning 40, and how many of your modern ABC belts were on the line? 

Hang on before you scurry off, let me save you the trouble, podnah.

Hopkins’ post 40 career record is 6-3, 0 KO and 3-3 in “title” bouts that generously include the light heavy Ring title he fought for 3x. He fought from middleweight to lightheavyweight.

“Not bad for a 40 year old legend,” you say?

Yeah, but the purpose is to compare to THE LEGEND, the Ol’ Mongoose, Archie Moore, the fighter Mr. Hopkins claims to be most like.

Now, grab your crotch, I don’t want the family jewels busting open on the concrete when I give you Archie’s numbers. How’s about 43-4-2 and 10-2 in full unified title bouts, the 10 wins being his undefeated lightheavy title reign and his 2 losses to HOF heavies, Rocky Marciano and Floyd Patterson.

Archie Decks The Rock

Archie Decks The Rock

Most of his fights  and knockouts were against heavies, too many for me to be bothered to count. Generally he’d only fight one or two lightheavy bouts in a year, mainly title defenses, and then cash in for the remainder of the year, most against ranked heavy contenders, fringe contenders and former contenders which was where the money was.

Then we have his last loss near 50 yrs of age against young Cassius Clay. What other old man in the history of boxing goes out on his shield against class like that?  

Now, stop your yelping and listen up. Nobody in any era has come close to that record, so I ain’t trying to skewer the era of your precious Mr. Hopkins. I’m just trying to hammer home some relevant history in your noggin is all.

Moore’s was the era when men were men and didn’t run around like it was Halloween dressed as executioners making silly signs like kids out on a dungeons and dragons lark. Like Liston, Archie was widely reputed to be 2-3 yrs older than his accepted birthday, meaning his post 40 record would be greater than Hopkin’s career record, but I don’t want to rub it in too harshly so as to ruin you for your wife.

Many a HOFer mixed in that post 40  record, many more than Hopkins faced in his career.

“How did he do it,” you ask?

Beats me and most anyone who stepped into the ring with him. I’d guess he was simply a one off fistic genius who was able to meld intelligence and discipline with waning but still formidable physical attributes in a way nobody else has come close to.

 Not sure if he ever divulged all his techniques for training and losing weight, but one famous method is gut wrenching, literally. He would eat a steak by chewing it very slowly and thoroughly, bite by bite, absorbing the juices and nutrients and then spit the spent bite into a bucket.

It’s no wonder he holds the record for the most KOs in boxing. He couldn’t wait for his post fight reward, the eating of the whole steak, a luxury beyond our imagination in his world of hurt.

Buy'em Dinner After the Big KO

Buy'em Dinner After the Big KO

So when the preening wonders of modern boxing science crow about being old school Archie Moore kind of tough, you can rest assured, a gaggle of em couldn’t lift the Ol’ Mongoose’s jock strap to carry it off.

Trust me on that.