Tag Archives: eddie chambers

Standing Tall–Tomasz Adamek vs Steve Cunningham

Christmas is coming early for area boxing fans in the little town of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania this year. The Sands Casino-Resort is hosting grudge rematch between former cruiserweight champs Tomasz Adamek (47-2, 29 KO) and Steve Cunningham (25-4, 12 KO) Saturday, December 22nd, a chance to see a good action contrast of styles by two top level pros.

Standing Tall

Standing Tall

Adamek is the more credentialed as a champion in both lightheavy and cruiserweight divisions and he is more acclimated as a top ranked heavyweight contender,  the division where this battle will be waged. Both are 36 years of age and turned pro within a year of each other, so how is it that Adamek sports almost twice as many wins as the former IBF cruiser champ USS Cunningham?

That is a more sordid revelation of the role promoters and managers play in the career of fighters, so skipping back to Cunningham the fighter, he won his belt the hard way in enemy territory of the hometown favorite Polish legend, Krzysztof Wlodarczyk, and Europe is where he’s spent most of his last 5 years, winning a few and losing a few more title matches.

These two are more oriented to old school gentlemen out of the ring, fighters in the ring type of mentality than the current trash talk, thuggish walk type of modern behaviors that promoters sell to the public like cotton candy. As such, there is no actual grudge that I can see other than that Cunningham feels like he was shorted by the judges when they first met that saw Cunningham hit the deck thrice between outboxing Adamek for periods in a thrilling seesaw battle, so here we are with the rematch.

On paper by careers, Adamek is the big favorite to win. No matter the howls of the litters of critics that hound every fighter from the start to finish of their careers, Adamek showed excellent nuance to control the range and pace of Eddie Chambers who reverted back to his losing spoiling tactics against Wlad Klitschko. It was an awkward, ungainly match when Chambers ditched his offense to go on a run after a supposed arm injury.

The last full fight of Cunningham I saw was the Troy Ross fiasco. Ross looked to have taken over that bout before suffering a nasty torn eyelid that was not for squeamish viewing. Cunningham was accused of the thumbing after Ross had knocked him hard to the canvas. Cunningham continued to reprise his canvas pratfalls in consecutive losses to Cuban defector Yoan Pablo Hernandez, a relatively light hitting fighter.

Could be that Cunningham’s punch resistance is on the wane, as good as reason as any for team Adamek to risk a rematch, but Cunningham has some speed and can box and move better than most, so he could cause some troubles if he stays upright. Adamek did look slower than normal against Chambers, perhaps enough for Cunningham to squeeze in more shots.

The stakes are the IBF North American Heavyweight Title and the #2 spot in IBF rankings

Adamek is much closer to the top of his form than is Cunningham, that’s the bottomline skinny going into their fight. Eventually opening tactics will play out and I see them reverting to previous stylistic form with Adamek prevailing, possibly by knockout this time, but, regardless, I see a good fight even if they can’t quite reach the heights of their first memorable encounter.

The Perfect Furious Storm–Tyson Fury vs Neven Pajkic

November 12 will mark Fury’s 1st professional homecoming in his birthplace of Manchester. The Brits are making much of his 3rd straight undefeated opponent angle, but facts are the Derek Chisora fight was the big one.

Fury vs Pajkic

Fury vs Pajkic

Canadian Champion Neven Pajkic is more than an opponent for Fury, the fight is being billed as a grudge match of bad blood between the two, something sure to rile the crowd up. Maybe, but it’s also a step down, stay busy, learn your craft type of fight that Fury needs to progress and yes, Fury is steadily accumulating very respectable resume.

The grudge factor would seemingly translate into an aggressive ring affair, but Fury is already an aggressive fighter, so I doubt there is enough animosity for either to raise(or lower) their game to another level. Pajkic gives away much height and reach and hasn’t had a knockout in his last 6 fights against inferior opposition to Fury. He does look like the prototypical Canadian tough guy who can have his moments though, perfect to provide the needed rounds for Fury to progress. 

The 23 yr old Fury is exactly where he needs to be as the #1 British heavyweight and #9 heavyweight in the boxrec ratings. He’s also the defending British Commonwealth belt holder for this bout, so he’s been a busy lad in his brief career thus far.

I have no doubt he could beat the new WBA “champ” Alexander Povetkin, but that fight is not likely to happen anytime soon. Povetkin won’t be anywhere near a top ten contender as long as his promotional team milk his career for as long as they are able like they did with Mr. David Haye.

Ultimately Fury is going to have to challenge a Klitschko brother for his title shot, something he needs at least another year or two in development. I’m thinking that a fight against one of the few remaining American fringe contenders in Las Vegas would be the perfect promotional and developmental fight for him sometime next year.

Welcome to check out the top 25 boxrec heavyweights here for your own recomendations:

http://boxrec.com/ratings.php?country=&sex=m&division=Heavyweight&status=A&SUBMIT=Go

Tony Thompson and Eddie Chambers are the only Americans in the top 10 and were scheduled to meet before Chambers came down with injury. Tomasz Adamek used #24 Michel Grant to prepare for his challenge to Vitali Klitschko, so that would seem to be ideal for Fury.

Then there is the spector of the Klitschko managed giant Russian, Alexander Ustinov, who recently acquired the European(EBU) title. That would be a well respected title challenge and a battle of giants and perhaps also an elimination bout for the right to challenge a Klitschko.

Tyson Fury has managed to remake the world into his own oyster thus far, so I look for him to make a statement with his homecoming and move on to bigger and better things, something sorely needed in the Klitschko depleted ranks of worthy contenders.

Neven Pajkic currently has first crack at the immediate future of Tyson Fury, so we’ll just have to see what he has to say.

Knockout of the Year– Sergio Martinez KO2 Paul Williams

~((BooM))~ The CHAMP:

Como se dice, "Adios, Amigo?"

Como se dice, "Adios, Amigo?"

Sergio Martinez shattered the glass ceiling that has kept him from the pinnacle of boxing by doing the unthinkable, airmailing the concussive force of a single short looping left handed grenade that blasted the immovable, unstoppable Paul Williams straight into dreamless Bolivia. Both were highly ranked in their multiple divisions for some time now and consensus type P4Pers, so this rematch was highly anticipated. The towering Williams come out hard with an evil blood in his eye glint to him as he went about the task of pounding Martinez into dust bunnies. Perhaps the only criticism might be it was too short of a fight with no chance for ebb and flow or drama, but it was a shocking, turnabout type of moment and absolutely the highest level signature KO of a fine bunch for me, one for the ages.

All 2 rounds of the fight here with the KO just after 5:30 mark. There seems to be a sound lag, so you will hear a huge bomb go off with the crowd roaring about 1 second before it happens on the tape.

The Worthy Contenders:

Fernando Montiel TKO4 Hozumi Hasegawa

The Swarm

The Swarm

Fernando Montiel put together a 6 second highlight clip of his career with a stunning left hook that sent the monstrous Hozumi Hasegawa stumbling back to the ropes where Montiel leaped in to snap off a flash combination that caused the ref, Laurence Cole to stop the fight in the last second of round 4. Both highly ranked in their divisions and fringe P4Pers with Montiel stepping up in weight and flying all the way over to Japan to take on a dominant champ who had a string of KO defenses. What mars this bout for me is the poor reputation of the ref, Laurence Cole, who has uncanny habits of terrible timing among many bad habits, stopping what had been 4 rounds of a Hasegawa textbook masterclass performance after 6 of the last 7 seconds that remained of the 4th round. The champ was just starting to recover when Cole steps in, losing the one minute’s more rest time due him.

Longtime Japanese boxing icon, Joe Kozumi, reported alternately that Hasegawa suffered a fractured rib or fractured jaw either in training or during the fight, but, regardless, that was a booming counter left hook that stumbled Hasegawa and a brilliant flash combo that forced the stoppage of the unstoppable. I would also add that had to have been one of the most gentlemanly technical fights fought at such a high level with nary a thing for the ref to do, both showing complete respect to the other for any minor incidents common in lefty/righty clashes. Hasegawa was very tight at the weight and only trying to break the Japanese record for consecutive defenses. He subsequently moved up two full divisions to featherweight to stage a rough tough masterclass over a bigger, stronger, younger undefeated contender for that WBC title in spite of suffering a terrible cut from a butt early on. He must have been really tight at banty to jump 2 full divisions with such a strong performance.

Rounds 3-4 with the final punches just after the 6:00 mark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YpUf_mqg9Sg&feature=related

Glencoffe Johnson KO8 Alan Green

Put a Knot on Your Noggin That Grandpa Soap Won't Wash Out!

Put a Knot on Your Noggin That Grandpa Soap Won't Wash Out!

I like that ol’ man Johnson took this bout on somewhat short notice and made a weight he hadn’t been out for a decade and then knocked out a prime contender who had never been stopped. Thing is that Green was coming off a one of the most technical lopsided losses I’ve ever seen against Ward and was not a highly regarded contender, but still, it’s the Road Warrior for the HOF for me. Nobody comes close to his decade long quality of competition, not to mention being well into his 40s and still willing to travel and cede unfavorable conditions and short money just to get a crack at the cream of his division. He’s become the signature ol’ timer of boxing, more so than any of his contemporaries.

All 30 seconds of round 8, a complete carpet bombing:

Wlad Klitschko had 2 stunning highlight reel knock em dead K-Os of Chambers in the last 5 seconds of the 12th and Samuel Peter at 1:22 of the 10th.

Diced, Then Iced

Diced, Then IcedThe downside is there was no drama of a tough fight or necessity other than Manny Steward challenging Klitschko to stop his methodical beatings and go for it. Still, nobody had ever iced these guys stone cold before, so a combination of being young, highly ranked and rock solid durability type of contenders to be so utterly dominated before the icing, it’s quite an accomplishment in one of the great dominating heavyweight careers.

Entire 12th rd with the KO just after the 3:00 mark:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKcVDfp9F8

My complete respect for the poor, unfortunate victims of these bombings. Takes a brave man to enter the ring and risk his physical and emotional integrity to end up on the down side of the latest highlight clip for schoolboys to giggle over, but such is the risk and nature of boxing.

9/11, Wladimir Klitschko vs Sam Peter Reprised

This coming Saturday, September 11th, Wladimir Klitschko and Sam Peter reprise their classic IBF eliminator match in 2005 that saw Klitschko hit the deck several times against the greatly feared, wide swinging, undefeated clubber who entered the bout at 24-0, 21 KOs.

Peter was on a horrific tear through the division back then and the general feeling in boxing was that Wlad had no heart for combat, and worse, was afflicted with a glass jaw that would quickly shatter.

The Champ

The Champ

It Seems like a distant, fuzzy era light years removed from the current heavyweight scene that has seen Wlad on a fine current run of dominance, going for his 10th straight title win and his 9th knockout. He not only holds the IBF title, but also the WBO, IBO, and more tellingly, the Ring belt, finally fulfilling the promise he held as a gangly 20 yr Olympic Gold Medalist, touted as the savior of the heavyweight division when he turned pro.

The Belts

The Belts

Wlad won that first confrontation with Peter, doing something that his critics said he couldn’t do, and that is overcoming adversity by regrouping his form and going about the task of picking Peter apart until the final bell ended the 12th round.

Peter disputed the decision, wanting a rematch, but the Fates had already set each out on separate paths, only to come back full circle after having run 5 years of boxing’s tortuous gauntlets.

Peter returns as a former WBC champion, having dropped his crown to Wlad’s older brother, Vitali, a couple of years ago. After a lethargic loss to Eddie Chambers in his next bout, Peter has won all 4 of his last bouts by knockout, and, just having turned 30 years of age a few days before the rematch, Peter is near the age of a traditional athletic peak.

Wlad will rightly be a big odds favorite due to his near invincible form since the 1st Peter fight in contrast to Peter’s pair of failures against Vitali and Chambers. Wlad is also 34 yrs old in his 58th career bout which is pushing the envelope for modern heavies.

Nigerian Nightmare Lite
Nigerian Nightmare Lite

Meanwhile, Peter has transformed himself since those losses, dropping some 25 lbs of weight from his ample frame as can be seen in this training photo.

Potentially he should be about as quick afoot or quicker than he was in the first bout, but the question arises as to what style he will utilize?

Since that first bout Peter has reformed his style from crude clubber into a boxer of sorts, but finally was outboxed by Vitali and Chambers. His “Wild Bull of the Pampas” style was effective the first time, putting Wlad in dire straits and needing every fiber of his being to right the sinking ship.

Assisted Boxing

Assisted Boxing

 Of course by the bout’s end, it was Peter hanging on he was so spent. Peter was lucky to hear the final bell.

There is no way Peter can ever outbox Wlad in a million years. Wlad has won almost every round he has boxed in his professional career, so Peter has to outslug him, plain and simple. Can he do it? Peter may be in his 2nd “Reformation” as a fighter, but Wlad has steadily improved his game fight by fight, and more importantly, has earned a bit of swagger in his walk and talk that he lacked before. Whether he has gotten too far afield from his humble Ukrainian roots with the videos and brash talk remains to be seen. Understandably Wlad has been frustrated by dubious antics that saw top contenders David Haye and Alexander Povetkin fall out of scheduled matches that resulted in Wlad being placed in the position of having to search and sign replacement fighters for his defenses these past few years.

I guess it can be seen as a backhanded compliment that the top heavies would rather withdraw to endure the scorn of fans than risk the typical methodical beating followed by a knockout that Wlad lays down on his overmatched opponents.

I don’t recall this phenomena afflicting previous champions, though. Usually top contenders can’t get a title shot soon enough for their satisfaction, but it’s a new era and a softer way of doing business I guess if fighters can move to pick up a weak cheese belt.

Although Peter is a replacement fighter, he is a worthy opponent who has retained a ranking and is very hungry after going on a long diet. He may no longer be the fan favorite on a rampage through the division as he was in the first match, but he does provide the potential for some spectacle that Wlad’s defenses have lacked IF he can connect with a clean shot.

The first fight was one of the most dramatic heavyweight fights of the decade, so I plan on being glued to the rematch.

The "Right" Way

The “Right” Way

Klitschko vs Chambers, The Fat Chances of Fast Eddie

http://www.ringnews24.com/index.php/site-map/boxing-news/339-klitschko-vs-chambers-the-fat-chances-of-fast-eddie.html

by Bobby Mac

Now, let me be up front and state that I like Eddie Chambers even if I am not always enthralled with his conditioning and style. Fast Eddie comes to fight and brings some stellar natural attributes to his challenge to Wladimir Klitschko‘s titles.

This is, however, not a billiards contest where the sharp shooting and sharp eyes of Fast Eddie might stand him in good stead, but a traditional blood sport that has been incrementally refined over the decades into it’s current twelve round championship format.

Wladimir Klitschko has made himself the master of those twelve allotted rounds, and almost never gives anything away to his opponents, no matter what their style, size, or strength is. Moreover, Wladimir rarely uses all of his allotted rounds, preferring to end fights sooner rather than later.

If careers were measured in rounds and stoppages instead of fights, Wlad and his brother Vitali would be in an elite class of their own, but thankfully careers are not measured in that fashion.

On his way to racking up 53 dominant wins with 47 KOs, a stellar record in any era, Wlad has been beaten in three major upsets against opposition he held almost all the advantages over, much like he does against Chambers, so therein lie the hopes and dreams of Fast Eddie.

Chambers has made upsetting bigger, stronger fighters part of his tidy 35-1, 18 KO record that has seen him to his current #8 Ring rating. He was the first to put a dent in the unblemished records of Derrick Rossy and Alexander Dimitrenko, and he also went the distance with Alexander Povetkin. Recently he defeated the former WBC champion Samuel Peter, all huge, strong fighters by any standard.

So, how does Fast Eddie turn the trick against Wladimir?

For starters, he seems to have whipped himself into a fine shape at 209lbs after stinging criticisms that he was sporting too much baggage. This is near the same form when he upset the massive Dimitrenko in his last fight, which has propelled Chambers into his first title challenge.

Returning to the scene of Wladimir’s last relevant loss against Lamon Brewster six years ago, Brewster used a concrete chin to break the strangely fragile stamina of Klitschko, who collapsed in a heap after 5 rounds. Chambers has proven to have a good chin thus far, but it seems a stretch to have to rely on Wlad collapsing in a heap again, but it has happened once, so the possibility is there.

It was seven years ago that Corrie Sanders used his lightning left hand out of a southpaw stance to surprise Wlad early with a big shot, and never let him recover for an early TKO. Chambers has never shown that level of power early in a fight, but Eddie does have some pretty fast hands and is capable of putting together the type of quick combinations that can drop a heavyweight, so he will be looking for this opportunity.

Realistically though, the above seems implausible for Chambers given the recent championship form of Klitschko, who is in the middle of his prime years. Wlad’s style is to impose a distance fight at range using what is arguably the most versatile jab in heavyweight history. It can be a shotgun in automatic mode, a pawing feint, a slapdown of defenses, or a set up for his excellent hook off the jab. Any fighter getting inside of his jab will be tied up by his prodigious size and strength, if not stretched out on the canvas from his right hand.

It all seems too much for Chambers to overcome, but Wlad is going to have to prove it one more time against the best proven American heavyweight today. Fast Eddie has already proven he belongs, and make no mistake, Chambers is the hungrier fighter with the greater incentive.

HBO thought so poorly of Chambers’ chances that they won’t be broadcasting this fight, which is a real shame. Maybe Chambers loses in a blowout, but he deserves better than being dismissed out of hand, especially since HBO has recently broadcast inferior American heavyweights in their title challenges.

If HBO had shown as much business acumen as the heart and ringmanship that Fast Eddie has shown in his career, maybe they wouldn’t be so rightly derided for poor matchups that have seen them lose market share, and called into question their devotion to the sport of boxing, which seems more oriented to painting by compubox numbers than the fighting spirit of the sport.

I expect both Wladimir and Chambers to acquit themselves quite nicely, so enjoy the moment.

I certainly will.