Tag Archives: Julio Cesar Chavez Jr

Día Mexicano@Ground Zero~Canelo vs Junior~Quien Es Mas Macho?

Saul Alvarez, 48-1-1, 34 KO, and Julio Cesar Chavez Jr, 50-2-1, 32 KO, currently two of Mexico’s most popular active boxers, square off on Cinco de Mayo weekend, Saturday, May 6, @ T-Mobile Arena, Las Vegas, Nevada in what is being hyped as the biggest all Mexican fight ever. Perhaps, but it also may well be the biggest fight this year as far as the financials goes though the Wladimir Klitschko/Anthony Joshua fight may surpass it or not. Regardless these two biggest fights of the year happen back to back weekends for a thrilling run for boxing.

Canelo has taken a lot of stick from fans for the delay of the Gennady Golovkin bout, but blame Richard Schaefer and Al Haymon for illegally gutting Golden Boy Promotions that have completely upended boxing that resulted in hundred million dollar lawsuits. Then we have All Star Boxing winning a rather dubious $8.5 million judgement they against Canelo in spite of having no contract with him…only in boxing and only in Floriduh could this happen.

So of course Canelo has had to follow the richest prize money against Amir Khan and Junior. Golovkin, in spite of his vastly superior boxing credentials, brings an inferior purse after the down year of 2016 that saw boxing in America it the lowest financial point in in the last 35 years regarding general public interest. Assuming Canelo prevails against Junior, the Golovkin fight will be twice as big as this time as compared to last year and primed for this September. White gloved, snooty, connoisseur snifting boxing purists may not like it, but Canelo has been giving the fans what they want the bulk of his career which is why he has been so financially successful save for the big civil judgement against him. All Star have filed a lien in advance to garnish that $8.5 million judgement on Canelo’s purse for this fight, a huge bite of cash for a really big OUCH!

Before the fight was announced: Best Buds

As to Junior, he’s taken well deserved stick for his lack of dedication, but make no mistake, this kid has a dangerous punch to him as future HOFer Sergio Martinez found out. His post fight career was utterly ruined when he was only barely to crawl out a survivor against Junior, and then Andy Lee KTFU.

After the fight was announced: Grrrrr

Canelo vs Junior

Canelo vs Junior

With this being an all Mexican superfight, the super special, superduper, WBC championship belt for the Mexican Champion of the World will be on the line. Three designs were presented to voted on with the participation of thousands of fans around the world, but primarily Mexicans fans that will decide the winning design, or at least that was the promise by WBC El Presidente Gordo Para la Vida Sulaimán. The “Winning” belt was obviously a complete redesign of the three…only in boxing in the WBC!

All the belts were designed by native Mexican Huicholes Indians. Here were the contenders.

 

And……………………….THE CHAMPION:

The All Mex WBC Belt

The All Mex WBC Belt

Word is that Canelo has made a special point to reject the belt that I assume involves WBC sanctioning fees in the hundreds of thousands of dollars. Money and pride is quite enough for Canelo who has indicated a disparagement of the WBC after some heavy handed demands they made upon his career. I suspect amends will be made before the fight since Canelo would otherwise be proud to accept such an outstanding design of his native countrymen.

The Network Numbers, the real bottom line in boxing these days:

The HBO replay of the Canelo-Liam Smith fight drew 459,000 HBO subscribers, but in perhaps in spite of the 50,000 fans that packed Cowboy stadium, the PPV sales appear approximately 300,000. However, it is also supposed the Smith fight was seen by 18 million viewers in Mexico on free television via Azteca 7. Notably, Alvarez’s fight this past May versus Amir Khan drew around 600,000 PPVs and 767,000 HBO subscribers on the replay. His Miguel Cotto fight drew 900,000 PPVs and the replay 901,000 HBO subscribers. Junior may prove to be bigger than all three combined, so we shall see.

Junior has hired legendary Juan Manuel Marquez boxing trainer Ignacio Beristain for this fight, and perhaps most tellingly the notorious Marquez BALCO PED pusher, Memo Heredia, as his physical trainer. Junior was slapped with a minor drug violation of using illegal diuretics to drop weight in the past plus one marijuana violation that cost him $900,000 in a clear daylight robbery by the Vegas commish, so it is quite sad and telling that Junior is resorting to these dubious means at this juncture. It becomes scary to contemplate what Junior could do pumped up on Memo Heredia’s PEDs.

As a preview to this Mexican  family guerra  in Mexico, Canelo older brother “Inocente” Ramon Alvarez was knocked out in the 2nd round by Junior’s younger brother “The Businessman” Omar Chavez to even up that series 1-1, so the Alvarez and Chavez family already have some history of competition. My question would be if Meme Heredia also works with Omar in a family affair?

Lest the 164.5 lb catchweight be a problem for Junior, here he is after hard training for 2 months in the mountains of Mexico a month before this fight, doubtless in the best condition of his somewhat wasted career as to his unfulfilled potential. Here he is probably near the lightheavy limit of 174 lbs looking ready to fight with fire in his eyes at that weight again. All he has to do is lose a gallon of water, and presto, he’s made the 164.5 catchweight with 36 hours to rehydrate and replenish to a probable 190+. Many construction workers deal with similar losses most every day working outside during the summer months.

Ripped Junior

Ripped Junior

Add in that Canelo likely to be at 180+ lbs come fight night, really this is what used to be an ol’ fashioned heavyweight fight. Canelo’s fabled El Gancho Izquierda should prove the difference. However long it lasts, it promises to be HOTLY contested in a WAR strategically waged by Canelo and emotionally waged by Junior, but only after Lupe Contreras asks them, “Quien is mas macho?”

Gennady Golovkin vs Daniel Jacobs~MSG, New York, New Yawk!

The WBC, WBA “super” and IBF middleweight champion Gennady Golovkin, 36-0, 33 KO, and WBA “regular” middleweight champion Daniel Jacobs, 32-1, 29, KO, square off Saturday, March 18 at Madison Square Garden, New York, New York, or New Yawk as the locals are often want to squawk.

This is a good match even if most think this will be another Golovkin beatdown. Jacobs has solid skills, power, and credentials and will be much larger in the ring come fight night, as in bigger than the lightheavy 174 lb limit. Golovkin in comparison is old school size, maybe 168 lbs come fight night as what now passes as a small middleweight these days, yet here he is dwarfing Marvin Hagler though nothing dwarfs the massive knuckle set of Marv!

Marv and Gennady

Marv and Gennady

Golovkin recently issued yet another fruitless 154 lb challenge to TUE, 49-0, who many expect to comeback for at least one more fight in the ring his protestations not withstanding. Interesting in that Golovkin refused to fight Saul Alvarez at the 155 Canelo catchweight he has created these past few years, an indication that Golovkin respects the power and danger of Canelo more than TUE. He righteously demands the full 160 limit for that bout that looks to be set for September if both get by their significant current tests.

First things first though. Canelo has the much bigger obstacle, that of taking on Julio Cesar Chavez Jr at a 164.5 lb catchweight. Many rightly perhaps sneer and deride Junior, but in spite of his lack of devotion to his training and career, he’s still a giant in good shape when compared to the more compact Canelo. Junior at the 160 limit utterly wrecked the health and career of Sergio Martinez, and blew by Andy Lee as if he was but a mosquito he splattered on his arm. Martinez soon retired with permanent immobility handicaps, but Lee won the WBO title shortly after the Junior disaster to bolster his relevance in the division, so if Junior wins this fight he’s definitely in the mix for a Golovkin fight at the 168 limit.

Nice announcement of the Golovkin/Jacobs, but will the fight turn out as good as the prefight cannon fire?

Nice announcement of the fight!

Nice announcement of the fight!

Oh no, the curse of Ring magazine strikes again with all 22 “experts” picking Golovkin! Man, that’s some heavy duty curse on the poor boy. Can he overcome all that bad mojo?

Will that curse also extend to Ring #1 P4Per, Roman Gonzalez, who takes on a formidable challenge after a very poor showing against then undefeated 115 lb champ, Carlos Barbie Doll Cuadras, to now go up against former 115 lb champ, Wisaksil Wangek, 41-4-1, 38 KO record. Wangek is from Thailand, who like Japanese fighters are often matched hard early in their careers instead of the pampered western world model. He also has another name like many Thais, that of Srisaket Sor Rungvisai, and lost his first two fights by KO, and that’s it for vulnerabilities. I wish both fighters well as the stakes couldn’t be bigger for both, but I favor Wangek in what should be a great fight if the ref and judges don’t screw up their end as they are too often capable in New York.

Bottom line: Most all as well as myself are also picking Golovkin in a mid fight knockout, but I do think Jacobs will win new fans by acquitting himself well and won’t go out easy. Losing to a future HOF great in a good fight used to be honorable, but nonetheless, Jacobs always has that outside chance, and just maybe….

Ho-Hum~Julio Cesar Chavez Jr vs Andrzej Fonfara

One of a zillion newly signed Al Haymon legions now, the “Son of The Legend,” Julio Cesar Chavez Jr, 48-1, 32 KO, seems to have settled his dispute with Top Rank to return on Showtime April 18 at the StubHub Center in Carson, CA. The bout will be at a 172lb catch weight against Polish lightheavy contender Andrzej Fonfara, 26-3, 15 KO.

Junior @ Work

Junior @ Work

Barring egregious officiating, something quite probable in boxing, especially as regards to the often pampered career of Junior who has struggled to make weight in every division he’s fought in, it looks to me like Chavez is making a major mistake and will be whooped badly. Fonfara may not look like much as first physical impressions go, but he’s a dead game, dead serious, very well trained lightheavy contender. Many, probably most fans thought he whooped the Montreal Manhood out of ballyhooed champ Adonis Stevenson only to lose that hometown styled decision.

Indeed, in the ever fading from public conciousness, growing ever more irrelevant Boxing world world, “it” happens as often as not and boxing poohbahs seemingly relish stepping into “it” again and again because of $ubstantial benefits they receive by controlling the results for chosen gaming interests.

Nonetheless, the combatants still have to glove up and step into the ring where the best laid plans of mice and men and corrupt boxing poohbahs can sometimes be derailed. A major consideration for Fonfara will be the catchweight since he’s been right at the 175 lb light heavy limit or over in his last 3 fights, now needing to weigh in 4 lbs less than he’s used to. Also thanks to the way boxing conducts it’s business, we don’t know if there will be a rehydration limit imposed on him. We do know Junior’s fight night weight will probably be over 190 lbs, but even if he’s bigger than Fonfara, he’ll be eating the hardest leather he’s ever experienced before. Junior has thus far shown a rock solid chin much to the chagrin of his manically raging critics, but Fonfara can crack some and will probably be going for the KO to take the fight out of shaky judges hands.

The fight itself absent the officiating could well prove to be all action and fan friendly. Does Junior have what it takes to win cleanly? He’s a big, very strong kid. Hopefully the result will be the right one.

Yes Virginia, sometimes even boxing gets one right. We’ll have to see about all that.

Julio Cesar Chavez Jr vs Brian Vera~Rematch in the Alamodome

Julio Cesar Chavez Jr was the favorite posterboy of former WBC Honcho For Life Jose Suleiman, R.I.P. He is also the favorite target of wrathful fans still furious over him being named after his legendary father, but now Junior looks to right his wrongs of his last bout against former Contender star Brian Vera with their rematch in the San Antone Alamodome on the first day of March 2014.

The First Time Around...

The First Time Around…

Junior was coming off a long suspension for marijuana use, way longer and infinitely more expensive than that handed down by the derided NSAC who slapped Floyd Mayweather promoted Mickey Bey with a bare 3 month suspension/$1000 fine after testing 30x over allowable “normal” testosterone levels. There’s no use in looking for justice in Nevada whose honchos were also quoted as saying they would no long rubber stamp fights after emasculated howls of Mayweather fans shook up Nevada big shots over the Saul Alvarez results.

So out with the old Nevada honchos and in with the new Nevada honchos with fresh, shiny faces and redesigned teflon rubberstamps.

Junior was so overweight in his return from suspension that the Vera fight was hopelessly lost unless Vera allowed enough leeway for Junior to squeeze in at 172.5 lbs. The usual flood of vitriol followed even before his disputed win, the public outrage being such that the Vera rematch was the best lucrative option as Top Rank struggled with what division the ever growing Junior will end up in.

Junior was also heavily disparaged during the most acclaimed moment of his career when he nearly pulled off a stunning knockout of reigning middleweight champ Sergio Martinez as time was running out. A chip off his ol’man’s block he looked as he damn near reprised the storied Meldrick Taylor knockout in a bout of legend that still gets folks grills broiling over the officiating “controversy.”

It just so happens that San Antone is a great place for an all action mano a mano fight that the rematch guarantees to be. Junior “promises” to be better prepared at the reported 168 lb contract weight, still well over Vera’s optimum weight, but  the Texas born and bred Vera must be feeling good about the rematch which is netting him a large purse and more recognition than he’s had in his solid career thus far. I wouldn’t be surprised to see the WBC add a bauble for them to scrap over, like an Interim Diamond Doodle Belt or an Inaugaral Platinum Poodle Belt, whatever fecundity they can come up with to tickle the WBC coffers.

As such this will be a moment of truth for both fighters. Vera needs to put on another good showing that might well land him a middleweight title shot down the road since I can’t see him really contesting against top super middleweights. Junior’s future is more uncertain in that he can no longer squeeze into the middleweight division and may well have problems making 168 lbs. He has so overgrown his natural big fight rivals, Saul Alvarez and Sergio Martinez, that the WBC went and rated him as mandatory to aging WBC 168 lb champion Sika Biko, a fight Junior could well win if he shows he can squeeze under the 168 lb trip wire. Andre Ward and Carl Froch have been making noises about easy money fights against him, but I doubt his sugar daddy Bob Arum would sacrifice him just yet when Junior could possibly have a successful run of WBC super middleweight title fights against the usual suspects.

The undercard features a fascinating bout for the simon purist guaranteed to be a grave insult to other ranked fighters and boxing critics. The highly acclaimed two time Olympic Gold Medalist southpaw Vasyl Lomachenko with a 396-1 amateur record that is likely the best in history, he challenges current WBO feather champ Orlando Salido, 40-12-2, 28 KO. The just turned 26 year old Lomachenko has only a single recognized pro fight against journeyman Jose Ramirez, a dubious bout that looked like a weak set up for the WBO International featherweight bauble  that Ramirez had only won the fight before. Salido may have some heavy use miles at 33 yrs of age and 358 rounds of war, but he’s still as hard a fighter as can be found in boxing who utterly destroyed the much touted P4P Puerto Rican phenom Juan Manuel Lopez, blasting him out twice for good measure. Poor Lopez has yet to recover his form.

Why the sudden push of Lomachenko to a title is likely to be found in the money HBO will be offering for the spectacle they expect to make out of it. I have nothing good to say about the bout given the shaky circumstances of Lomachenko’s first fight, but he’s the latest promotional darling and money fighter so look for the ref and the judges to give him all the breaks as they nickle and dime Salido in the ring and on the cards. I waive any further comments until I have a chance to review the fight for “relevancy,” but if waged legitimately and Lomachenko indeed turns out to be “the one,” well of course it would be good for boxing. Unfortunately more promoters will be looking to bum rush willing novice fighters into the limelight of a title as the panic over the impending retirement of aging PPV stars with nobody to replace them spreads.

Perhaps with near 400 amateur ama bouts plus a reported half dozen fights under the auspices of the AIBA organized World Series of Boxing that he won, Lomachenko may not be boxing’s virginal, fresh faced cherub, but the step up in conditioning alone is huge at the championship pro level not to mention the power and variety of punches and stratagies used.

We’ll see soon enough what the refs, judges, and antisocial media ninnies have to say about this promotion which seems almost guaranteed to kick off the year in controversy.

167.5 lbs X 2

167.5 lbs X 2

Lomachenko 125.25~Salido 128.25 loses title on the scales

Lomachenko 125.25~Salido 128.25 loses title on the scales

 

GOD, Guns, & Holy Ghost Robert Guerrero vs Showtime Debut of Floyd Mayweather Jr

Cinco de Mayo got a whole lot more interesting this year when Floyd Mayweather Jr signed a mega six fight deal with Showtime and Golden Boy Promotions. A preposterous figure of around $220 million was quoted, but regardless, the first installment comes against the interim WBC welter titlist Robert The Ghost Guerrero for the supreme claim to the WBC welterweight title being defended by Mayweather. That’s Saturday, May 4th, but look out and be forewarned all ye Mayweather team and fans. Robert Guerrero says God is on his side and he enjoys packing heat when away from home as happened recently at JFK airport in New York City.

Yes, Virginia, this “event” seems to have taken on a personality of it’s own, perhaps not even being a fight any more. Or it could be one of the greatest fights of this era, or just another Mayweather and Showtime sham. See the Mayweather/Victor Ortiz fight and the Showtime Super Six and Super Banty tourneys for reference.

It’s certainly not the all time P4P matchup of the millennium like Pacquiao vs Mayweather would have been. That horse bolted the gate 3 yrs ago and ain’t been seen in these parts since then. Nor is it the fascination when two big heavyweights meet in that rare ripple of time where the fate of the world almost seems to hinge on the result. This fight takes place in an odd shift where overlapping boxing eras intersect with the supermega money of politics, media business rivalries, and global realignments.

We also have the unseemly specter of the dad trainers polluting the promotion, Ruben Guerrero vs Floyd Mayweather Sr. They vowed to beat the tarballs out of each other in the ring or in the parking lot, so who knows where that goes? Crazy uncle Roger Mayweather started a ring riot years back when he attacked Zab Judah in the middle of a round and wrestled with the referee Richard Steele in a disgracefully officiated match that should have been an automatic disqualification loss for Mayweather according to the standard rule long been in force.

Mayweather thus far in his career has received every benefit of every foul ruling and final decision to accumulate one of the best known safety records of his era. He trains year round but only exposes himself to one fight a year against a carefully selected opponent for the past 7 years, all while a golden era of welters fought each other tooth and nail for supremacy.

Getting back to boxing basics, on paper the Ghost only has a ghost of a chance, but look again. It took a Ghost to track down the ghost of the ever elusive Mayweather and badger him into signing the fight contract, so already Guerrero is up on the cards of opportunity. Speaking of opportunity, the Mayweather main supporting undercard bolted to ol’ San Antone for greener pastures when Saul Alvarez took his WBC/WBA unification fight with Austin Trout there to score one of the higher level checkmate boxing wins of this era. The antisocial media howler monkeys hate him, but Alvarez has officially arrived as the A side to any proposed match for him in boxing, including the aborted fight with Mayweather. The pressure is now on Mayweather to see if he can keep up with the rapidly advancing 22 year old kid in the perfect record department, 42-0-1, 30 KO compared to the Mayweather 43-0, 26 KO record. Moreover, can Mayweather recover the considerable Mexican PPVs lost with the Alvarez defection?

There are many other variables affecting this fight, so it’s hard to touch on all of them in an orderly manner, but let’s start with the Guerrero losses. How a fighter loses and his reaction to it is often informative. His first loss was to Gamaliel Diaz, an unheralded fighter who has since maintained a high Ring rating until a loss dropped him only a few weeks ago. The Ghost lost the split on the official cards, but I scored it for him by a couple points in a sloppy uninteresting fight where he looks to have fought down to the level of his opponent. He knocked him clean out in the rematch with solar plexus shot in the 6th, very impressive in that Diaz had never been put down before much less out.

Then the Orlando Salido fight that Guerrero lost, yet was overturned when Salido tested positive for steroids. I had it a close competitive fight with Salido eeking the win, but what was telling is that Salido had most of the fire and offensive activity. Guerrero looked like he was sleepwalking at times, scarcely even bothered when Salido landed flush and also looked painfully slow. I’m thinking he was probably tight at the weight given his ample frame that has marched rapidly through four more divisions since then. That was also 6-7 years ago, light years in time as applied to a boxer’s short career, but nonetheless a window into the boxing development of Guerrero. Perhaps it is not without coincidence that 6-7 years ago is when Mayweather began to command his biggest purses and most acclaim and that Guerrero is also light years younger at age 30 to Mayweather’s 36 and the hungrier fighter by far.

The conclusion is that Guerrero has never been beaten up and seems to have found his perfect niche at welter where he recently relished the combat against undefeated raging bull Selcuk Aydin and then long time former WBC #1 and mandatory, later the WBC  champ, Andre Berto. Guerrero’s new tough inside roughhouse style is always difficult for the pure boxer of Mayweather because the Ghost also possesses decent boxing chops out of the southpaw stance, so the long odds I hear around the 10 to 1 range might shorten up considerably by fight night as big players take a harder look at this fight.

The Eyes Know

The Eyes Know

In a fairly officiated contest, I see Mayweather needing to work extra hard for a win like he did against Miguel Cotto in his last dukem up. Guerrero is a considerably fresher boxer on a long time upswing than was Cotto who has been in some all time wars and is winding down his career. Mayweather has certainly not recently looked the P4P juggernaut the boxing industry has made him out to be, another example being the Victor Ortiz “incident,” a prearranged orchestration ala his infamous dustup with Big Show. If the Ortiz knockout is to be in the record, then the Big Show brass knuckles knockout should be also, both preferably in the official WWE record where they could be better savored as a matching pair of great heel performances of modern times.

Vs Miguel Cotto

Vs Miguel Cotto

Anyone seriously contemplating the Guerrero fight should consider the context of the Mayweather career as he winds down. He turned pro making good money on HBO shows where they promoted him as the P4P successor Roy Jones Jr. Regardless of what anyone thinks of the Manny Pacquiao fight that never was, Mayweather ended up squeezed off between the all time boxing legends of Roy Jones in the 1990s, superseded by Manny Pacquiao in the 2000s by consensus accolades, a snub with a building pressure that put an edge on him. He finally boiled over with a blizzard of felony assault and other charges in 2011 leveled against him resulting in a plea bargain stint in The Big House in 2012. That edge has forced his hand into the type of unsavory comments and accusations against his rivals that he knows will anger his critics and bolster his substantial fan base, so in his world perhaps there is a rhyme to his reason.

His recent regius remunerations have been due to a seismic shift in modern American culture in that his serious felony transgressions have greatly appealed to the hip hop culture where prison time lends street credibility. The troubled man-child, Mike Tyson, had been their posterboy in the past, so Floyd became their unholy mantraman as the national plates of identity shifted with unstable modern American culture.

Thing is, when the historians take over and look at careers to talk about all time rankings and legacies, his record becomes The Big Lie after he leaves Top Rank for Golden Boy. There are huge gaps in his record at a time when equally talented fighters are challenging themselves more frequently with more fights against as good or better competition, but such is the nature of the promotional business that could care less about truth or boxing legacy, they just want the bottom line of his considerable PPV sales when he fights.

And that’s another part of The Big Lie, that he’s the PPV king. His promoter, Oscar de la Hoya, is the all time PPV king by record, and if you average out all of Mayweather’s 8 PPV fights, two with Top Rank and six with Golden Boy, they are almost identical in numbers to Manny Pacquiao’s last 8 , but Pacquiao has many more PPVs that easily put him over the top as the first ever featherweight to be put on PPV promotions. Most Mayweather fans could care less about the facts, it’s the perception that in spite of losing out on accolades, they desperately need to affirm he’s the best not unlike Mike Tyson was made out to be even as his career wound down against vastly inferior competition compared to his peak years that were cut short by long stays in the pen. Tyson was also signed to a Showtime blockbuster contract, but Tyson supposedly did not receive the full value of his contract when Showtime elected to pay more pressing bills stay in business rather than go under, thus leading to Tyson’s infamous bankruptcy.

And you know it’s The Big Lie when Forbes, and other mainstream media outlets report that Mayweather is the highest paid athlete in the world, using his 2 year reported income figures to everyone’s one year figures. Yes folks, it’s not just the boxing press with collective cognoscenti up each other’s arrears, the history of the “mainstream” media is rift with tabloid sized lies, mistruths, and deceptions. They’ve been drafted into action not because of any inherent interest in his boxing career, but because there’s an immense amount of money to be made picking his bones apart before he departs boxing.

Even the infamous Mayweather drug testing program has taken a back seat to this nonpromotion that has scarcely seen Mayweather do more than go between his Vegas lairs at his gym and at home. Noteworthy is that near as I can see, NSAC, Golden Boy, Al Haymon, and Mayweather have refused to address the two part article Thomas Hauser put together last year concerning Mayweather’s alleged positive drug tests and cover up by USADA illicit drug testing cartel:

http://www.maxboxing.com/news/max-boxing-news/the-ped-mess-part-one

Meanwhile, recent inroads of BALCO associated trainers Victor Conte and Angel Heridia AKA Hernandez into boxing have stirred up a hornet’s nest of disputatious minor infractions resulting in a NSAC one year suspension and millon dollar fine of Julio Cesar Chavez Jr for smoking marijuana, yet only a minor fine and disregarded suspension of Conte trained Mayweather stablemate Andre Berto for trace steroids. Berto merely moved his show to California to fight Guerrero which is where the Mayweather/Guerrero fight was birthed. 

Boxing has a way of eating it’s own, taking down better, more honorable fighters throughout history than Floyd Mayweather. I’m sensing a lot of rat traps being set around the perimeters as boxing may well be moving past the old into the new as Macao and Singapore and Dubai move to supplant Las Vegas for big fights. More telling is Floyd sporting the “Oscar” shiner of surrender going up against a new gunslinger single handedly promoting the fight in unlikely religious and political circles of God and Gun constituents. Lord knows what happens outside the ring when they clash with hiphoppers in the MGM after typical grevious ring shenanigans fire up the riff raff.

Put on the blindfold to be spun around to toss your dice and throw your darts to pin the ragged tail on the donkey, there’s your winner, but we’ll just have to see for ourselves. 

Shine On Souvenir

Shine On Souvenir