Tag Archives: maidana

Marcos Maidana Tracks Down Adrian Broner

Looks like Marcos Maidana gets another shot at redemption against Adrien Broner at the Alamodome in San Antonio December 14th. Maidana has actually done quite well for himself after his torpid debut at welterweight against Devon Alexander last year. He is really a small framed junior welter, but he takes his orders from Golden Boy who wanted him in a more glamorous division where they needed quality name opponents, opponent being the operative word here. Maidana has been used in the non starring role against heavily hyped Golden Boy “stars.”

The Golden Boy promoted Maidana got off on the wrong track with  when he knocked out their Oscar de la Hoya heir apparent Victor Ortiz in a spectacular encounter. It didn’t help that competing manager contract disputes over his services soon combined with a terrible traffic tragedy in Argentina that made his services in the US problematic for a spell. He was then poorly served by unsporting officiating in the big name Amir Khan and Eric Morales debacles, yet onward he punched with a current 84% KO average, one of the highest in boxing in support of his 34-3 record.

Tubs & Lean

Tubs & Lean

Adrian Broner has been the heavily hyped Al Hayman fresh flash posterboy, yet now looking quite corpulent around his corpus, seemingly so “flush” as to “dump” $20 dollar bills during his potty sessions if his inflated ego video productions offer up any proof. After being touted as the next Floyd Mayweather Jr by the Hayman/Golden Boy combine, he’s been matched against an assortment of carefully selected featherweights, dwarfs, and feather dusters who have actually done quite well against his plodding defenseless version of the Floyd Mayweather shoulder roll. Now he goes against a true  slugger in Marcos Maidana who has knocked out the bigger, stronger, more talented Victor Ortiz and the tougher Josesito Lopez.

While only 24 years and still developing, Broner is still officially unblemished at 27-0, 22 KO, 81% knockout ratio. Most of those fights were at 130 or 135 divisions before completely jumping over the 140 division, now in his 2nd fight at 147. Likely he’ll never make 140 and why should have have to if the bigger money is in 147?

Yet ridiculously the Gimpy Ring ratings continue to rank him at both welter and lightweight and P4P, a total failure of logic other than being a rubber stamp for the Hayman/Golden Boy paymasters who have taken over the spare bones and mangy hide of what used to be a proud magazine in the days of Nat Fleischer.

Fortunately for Broner, Maidana is no Fancy Dan in the boxing department though he can box some when he has a mind to. Unfortunately for Broner the Maidana power is proven at higher weights. Broner has shown poor defense in his career, probably due to being in against little guys with little demonstrable power at those lighter weights. Hard to say if he can improve his defense, but on any fair playing field, Maidana must be salivating at the thought of an easy to hit plod forward style, a perfect stylistic match up for him, but that may be illusory.

The reason being that Maidana is seemly yet again “the opponent” if recent form of Hayman/Golden Boy fights follows script. They continue to prop up Broner and Amir Khan as stars for example against all evidence of their limitations with the hope they can maybe make a decent PPV with Floyd Mayweather Jr who doesn’t have any credible Golden Boy fighters left to dance with. No problem, this combine will manufacture cardboard cutouts for Mayweather to “fight.” 

Golden Boy has actually had some really great fights over the past few years, like James’ Kirkman against Carlos Molina and Angulo for example, but poor Kirkman can’t seem to stay out of trouble and jail. He’s recently been released from captivity, signed with his new 50 cent manager, and rushed on a ‘Top Rank card this weekend in Madison Square Garden, so strike him as savior for Hayman/Golden Boy when Mayweather retires. Keith Thurman has discipline and potential, but he’s been way underpromoted for whatever reason. Meanwhile the GB Argentinians, Matthyse and Maidana, they’re poor boys from a poor country, so they’re willing to brave the ring officials stacked against them, yet against the odds they somehow managed to make some the best fights in boxing.  And you wonder why they claim boxing is dying when the best, most exciting fan friendly fighters willing to fight anytime, anywhere get the short straw in what should be their biggest opportunities.

Perhaps there’s some hope in that the fight is in San Antonio which has a rich boxing tradition. San Antonio is where Manny Pacquiao burst into the spotlight in his demolition of P4P great Marcos Antonio Barrera not that many moons ago, but another era in the flash primes of typical fighters. The dubious Laurence Cole is the likely assigned ref, a dissertation of all his ring transgressions being the perfect submission for the ambitious business or a law grad. I should note his near flawless handling of his last fight I witnessed, the Alvarez vs Trout highly technical boxing match. He only made one mistake when he broke them up in the first round while they were in an exchange. He immediately recognized his error before laying back to enjoy one of the cleaner boxing exhibitions this year, so maybe there’s some hope for this fight since it could be a great slugfest if there is no interference..

We’ll be watching.

El Terrible Mismatch–Danny Garcia vs Eric Morales

The old Houston Astrodome, now named Reliant Arena, is the boxing venue March 24 when young phenom Danny Garcia challenges Mexican Legend Erik Morales.

By credentials alone, Danny Garcia wouldn’t even be in the same ballpark as Erik Morales, but such is not the way boxing works. Garcia is young and hungry and owns recent wins over Nate Campbell and Kendall Holt, so now he’s matched against the grizzled old Mexican warrior attempting one last go at glory.

The Heyday of Morales vs Barrera

The Heyday of Morales vs Barrera

Where to start trying to figure the meaning of a bout like this might begin with the ill advised comeback of 35 year old Erik Morales after retiring several years ago. He had been knocked out consecutively by the rapidly rising Manny Pacquaio and then outmuscled and outbrawled by then WBC champ David Diaz when he moved up to lightweight.

Look up Mexican Warrior in the dictionary and Erik Morales will be among the definitions, yet after a long and brutal career as one of boxing’s brightest stars, he just didn’t seem to have it any more. Complaints about ringing in his head caused some concern, so his retirement was a relief for all those interested in his well being.

El Terrible vs Hands of Steel

El Terrible vs Hands of Steel

His weight promptly blew up to an unrecognizable whale scale, so fans were still concerned about his health, but after 3 yrs on the banquet circuit he returned at a flabby 147 lbs to outpoint the forgettable Jose Alfaro. Gone was his timing and balance, but his strength of will to fight remained, so it was onward and upward to Willie “Hands of Steel” Limond and Francisco Lorenzo as he gamely boxed his way into a semblance of fighting shape in more forgettable fights. The Lorenzo fight saw him being well whipped and out of clues in spite of taking the unanimous decision.

El Golpe

El Golpe

Morales managed to go the distance in a terrible fight against Maidana who should have gotten the early stoppage. Morales’ right eye was closed in the 1st round by a vicious Maidana uppercut and he took a beating. Eventually Maidana realized he had a real tough fighter in front of him who wouldn’t go easily and lost his stomach for the sometimes cruel brutality of  boxing , so Morales promptly took advantage of the weakness and went after Maidana hard, thus giving his fans the support they had been waiting for.

Truth is, by the end of the fight Morales had something of the look of the young Eric Morales when he refused to buckle and stung Maidana with some well placed shots. Still, there was no reason at all to make him take an unholy beating like that, but some fighters just cannot leave gracefully.

Though he lost the bout, his name was back in the public eye and was floated in with potential bouts with Floyd Mayweather Jr, Juan Manuel Marquez, and Amir Khan. Instead the WBC maneuvered him into another forgettable bout against Pablo Cesar Cano for the title they had shamelessly stripped from undefeated champion Gary Bradley.

Danny Garcia vs Kendall Holt

Danny Garcia vs Kendall Holt

So now they call Morales a champion and he defends against a quick, prime boxer type in Danny “Swift” Garcia in what could be another ill advised 12 round war on the Morales body which just saw the bout delayed as Morales had some kidney stones removed.

The hope is that Morales is starting to physically look like a Mexican Warrior instead of the Tijuana Tamale he resembled at the start of his comeback, so the bout has the potential of a high action classic to it. It helps that Garcia is not the big puncher that can discourage Morales who will likely be the aggressor in this bout.

All I can say is the 23 year old Garcia best not take this version of Morales lightly if he wants to make any inroads in boxing. He wants to swap his 7th Ring rating against the 5th rating of the old man.

Maidana took a lot of flack for allowing Morales back into the fight after running out of gas and desire in the mid rounds. Morales knows he could be back in the business end of the next big fight against  Floyd Mayweather Jr, Juan Manuel Marquez, and Amir Khan with a resounding victory over the kid. 

No fighter ever had any more desire than Eric Morales, but is the kid smart enough, quick enough and in good enough condition to overcome that desire and ring experience? Their intertwined fates await the unraveling hour as the days and seconds tick down to the sounding of the first bell.

Fight of the Year—Jhonny Gonzalez TKO6 Jackson Asiku

I’m surprised that I’ve heard no mention yet of the major Fight of the Year awards by Ring, BWAA, and ESPN. Perhaps that’s in deference to this Saturday’s coming match ups which could theoretically see Bernard Hopkins become the oldest fighter to win a major title or could see an all time fire fight between Marcos Huck and Denis Lebedev.

Typically, the earliest boxing months of the year get overlooked in deference to the all too common short memory span gene that afflicts most of the human species that includes the subspecies, Homo Hackeris, the boxing cogsnetti.

BIG NAME FIGHTS also always have priority over little fights, so with these factors in mind, likeliest frontrunners are Marquez vs Kasidis, TKO 9, and Khan vs Maidana, UD 12, both good action fights of recent vintage.

There are of course any number of all action dramatic fight of the year types in any given year, and as in any beauty contest, usually your personal favorite loses out. I can accept such routine defeat, but imagine my disappointment in finding out that perhaps the greatest ever modern fight staged under the Marquis of Queensbury rules, Alexis Arguello vs Aaron Pryor, their first fight, it amazingly lost out to Bobby Chacon UD 15 Rafael Limon IV, their 4th installment.

At least that was a great fight and Bobby Chacon also won the next year against Cornelius Boza Edwards. Chacon was one of my favorite fighters and game as can be so I’m happy such a great fighter of his day found his place in the sun, but still.

The sheer combination of technical boxing, slugging, ebb and flow, pace, endurance, heart, and dueling ringmanship exhibited by two among the greatest fighters to ever match up against each other in their primes, Arguello/Pryor ticks all the boxes including a minor or major controversy depending on your point of view about the “Black Bottle.”

But enough meandering warm and fuzzy reminiscing, in the here and now of this year, Jhonny Gonzalez and Jackson Asiku staged one of the most dramatic fights I’ve ever seen.

Gonzales is a scrappy Mexican warrior and championship fighter coming out of the banty division. He came up the hard way through the Mexican system, turning pro at age 17 and losing his first two fights before fighting his way to his current 47-7, 41 KO record.

Bulled to the ropes, Jhonny decks Jackson

Bulled to the ropes, Jhonny decks Jackson

His only three losses since 2002 have been to big punching great championship fighters, Israel Vazquez, Gerry Penalosa, and Toshiaki Nishioka, fights he was dominating before succumbing.

Jackson Asiku has a similar background, coming up as a tough Ugandan block of ebony fighting out of Australia who was also rode hard and put up wet early on. Action Jackson went on a six year win streak against some solid competition that netted him the British Commonwealth title. Technically he was the bigger man as a lifelong featherweight and a hard as nails pressure fighter never having been knocked out.

Jhonny Gonzalez had previously been knocked out, but he had also notched wins against the best such as Mark Johnson and Mexican legend Fernando Montiel who is currently a Ring Banty champ and P4Per, and now Gonzalez was moving up after a devastating knockout loss.

Asiku leaped at him like a leopard, but Gonzalez can fight inside or out, and he banged Asiku every which way, yet still Asiku attacked at a ferocious pace and the drama was set.

Could Gonzalez last in a bigger division or had he reached his limits of a after a long hard fought career against some of the best, 53 fights?

The answer came after Jhonny bounced Asiku off the canvas several times and had him finally listing like a ship looking for the right spot to go down with all hands on deck. The pace and urgency of the fight was incredible, and truth be told, Gonzalez is one of the very best all action type of fighters today with plenty of previous thrillers.

Going, going, GONE!

Going, going, GONE!

Where the establishment frontrunners fall short, ie: Golden Boy, starts with one of the worst refereeing efforts this year by Joe Cortez, interfering at every stage when the action grew compelling, even attempting to hold up Khan at a dire moment of dimming consciousness as Maidana stood over him.

Marquez/Katsidis was a more leisurely fight, pretty much a technical fight save for Katsidis knocking down Marquez hard for the umpteenth time in his career which had spectators wondering if the old man had come to the end of the road. Marquez roared back, but then the ref stopped the fight with Katsidis still game, bulling forward, another ref transgression possibly affecting the outcome.

We will see if Golden Boy Promotions gets one of their big stars in the fight of the year. Juan Manuel Marquez vs Juan Diaz won last years Ring FOY with the Marquez name dominating the past 3 years after brother Rafael took honors the 2 years previous with his efforts against Israel Vasquez.  The Marquez brothers also won the BWAA FOY the last two years, Rafael and then Juan Manuel respectively.

Pictures and words will have to suffice in lieu of the Jhonny Gonzalez/Jackson Asiku fight video which was terminated because of copyright violations. This little gemstone is safely buried now in some big business bureaucratic file never to be seen again one supposes.

That Jhonny Gonzalez is also promoted by Golden Boy is rich irony indeed.

So, it’s Jhonny Gonzalez and Jackson Asiku this year for me, a high drama, all action fight of perfect contrasting styles with little referee interference save for issuing counts on Asiku. Truth be told, I doubt the fight will even be considered it falls so far out of the cogsnetti radar, but I have to pay tribute to these two game warriors who are the real face of boxing at it’s best.

Next in the queue, Knockout of the Year and Fighter of the Year……..>>>>>>>>>